On Location

2010 Participant Stories

12/1/2010
Submitted by 2010 Stories

Argentina
Armenia
Australia
Belarus 
Bolivia
Brazil  
Bulgaria  
Burundi  
Chile  
China  
Congo  
Cuba  
Ecuador  
Finland  
Georgia  
Honduras  
India  
Indonesia  
Macedonia  
Malaysia  
Morocco  
Pakistan  
Philippines  
Romania  
Russia  
Slovakia  
South Africa  
Taiwan  
Thailand  
United Kindom  
United States  
Vietnam  
Zimbabwe  

 

Argentina

 

Pujato es una pequeña localidad de la provincia de Santa Fe, República Argentina. Tiene dos Clubes de Ciencias, uno el Nº76 “Prof. Dr. Julio Maiztegui” de la Escuela Primaria 1345 y el Nº136 “Dr. Bernardo Houssay” de la Escuela Secundaria 241. Trabajan en actividades relacionadas con las Ciencias en forma conjunta.

En esta oportunidad se sumaron en el Control de la calidad del agua de un curso natural, producto del escurrimiento de los campos de la región. Se decide monitorear el agua del arroyo tributario del Arroyo Ludueña que desemboca en el Río Paraná. La actividad se realiza el día 25 de octubre, se inicia a la hora 16 en día con cielo despejado y presencia de viento sur.

Armenia

Vanadzor, Dilijan and Goris

Environmental Information Centers, or Aarhus Centers, functioning in 14 residential areas of Armenia, organized training seminars on September 18 devoted to World Water Monitoring Day for the coordinators and staff of four of the Aarhus Centers (Vanadzor, Dilijan, Goris, Gyumri).  Each of these Centers was provided with monitoring kits and field excursions were conducted on October 18, November 18 and November 28, 2010. The excursions typically involved young people, in particular schoolchildren and students in the measures.

On October 18, the Center implemented monitoring of water of Vanadzor tributary to river Pambak with the schoolchildren of town Vanadzor. It was a warm and pleasant day and at 16:30 the schoolchildren, together with coordinator of Aarhus Center Perch Bojukyan, approached tributary Vanadzor and conducted the tests. The results: Air temperature was +20C0, water temperature was +12C0. Water turbidity was 40JTU, quantity of dissolved oxygen in water - (DO) - 4 ppm, saturation with oxygen - 37% and pH – 7.


On November 18, Goris Aarhus Center, responding to the concerns of the population, initiated and organized a visit to river Vararakn for water monitoring within the area of town Goris. This river emerges from mountains and flows through Akner, Verishen and Goris town. With the help of WWMD monitoring kits, the following indicators were measured: Air temperature +18*C, water temperature +12*C, , quantity of dissolved oxygen in water - (DO) - 8 ppm, saturation with oxygen - 74% and  pH – 8, turbidity - 40JTU.


On November 28 at 14:30, Dilijan Aarhus Center with its volunteers, “Arevordi” Eco Club children, “Hope Bridge” NGO Dilijan branch, head and members of debate club, and schoolchildren participating in “Water drop is invaluable” program implemented water monitoring of Aghstev river to discover the degree of water pollution. The purpose of the measure was also providing involvement of young people in a water resources protection process through education and awareness.

It was clear, sunny weather without wind and the participants selected the segment of river upstream of which household wastewater was discharged into the river. The results: Air temperature was +18C0, water temperature was +12C0. Water turbidity was 40JTU, quantity of dissolved oxygen in water - (DO) - 4 ppm, saturation with oxygen - 37% and  pH – 7, i.e. neutral.


After making all instructions for monitoring and comparing the readings with the scales it was clarified that Aghstev river water was of average turbidity. Representatives of “ITEC” NGO, “Davitbekyan Ukhter” NGO, “Club of Environment and Nature  Lovers” NGO, chief specialist of the RA Syuniq regional authority’s Environmental department, and active young people all participated in World Water Monitoring Day. The coordinators and participants of Aarhus Centers implemented monitoring of surface water resources, mainly of rivers and their tributaries in their residential areas before December 1 and represented the data to CWP NGO. It was decided to represent the obtained results to the local self governing bodies and to publish the results and measures in the mass media.

Yerevan

To celebrate the World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) in Armenia, the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Sustainable Management of Biodiversity (SMB) Programme hosted a special event on September 16 in the Ani Plaza Hotel in Yerevan.


As part of the mentioned event, the RA Minister of Nature Protection, the RA Minister of Education and Science and the Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany, Mr. Hans-Jochen Schmidt delivered opening speeches.


Other attendees included high-ranked officials of the GTZ-SMB partner-ministries in Armenia (RA MoNP, RA MoA, RA MoTA, RA MoES), heads and representatives of international and local organizations, as well as all those school teachers, pupils and eco-club members who were the key players in the campaign 2010.


The GTZ-SMB Programme used this special occasion to create and raise awareness of the importance of biodiversity and sustainable use of our natural resources.


During the event, GTZ-SMB presented the results of its 2010 environmental education campaign entitled: “Exploring Biodiversity of Rivers and Streamlets in Armenia” successful implementation of which was achieved due to productive collaboration with the RA Ministry of Nature Protection (MoNP), RA Ministry of Education and Science (MoES), and particularly with experts of the National Institute of Education (NIE) and Environmental Effect Monitoring Center.

In the framework of the campaign and intent on teaching about modern environmental pedagogic methods, biodiversity of rivers and biological monitoring techniques, the GTZ-SMB Programme organized five 3-day trainings for a total of 120 school teachers from Armenia’s regions and Yerevan. As a result of these preparations, the teachers and trainers were able to organize eco-excursions with more than 1200 pupils and eco-club members who carried out comprehensive scientific assessments of water quality of rivers and streamlets in their communities.

A competition entitled “Rivers – Living Ecosystems” was designed to motivate both, teachers and pupils, to explore biodiversity, examine and evaluate water quality of Armenia’s waterways. The results were submitted to experts’ jury, tasked with choosing the winners of the competition.

During the World Water Monitoring Day event on September 16, a 15-minute documentary revealing the campaign’s concept and outcomes was shown. After the film screening session, the Awarding Ceremony took place, during which the winners of the competition were presented with special prizes. An exhibition of children’s art-works was held afterwards, and the event culminated in a reception.

Australia

Queensland

Australia is the second driest continent on the earth and in Queensland as well as other parts of Australia drought has been experienced over the last number of years.

The SEQWater Grid was developed to ensure a safe, secure and sustainable water source for now and into the future. Seqwater as the bulk water supplier for this water grid is also responsible for water supply from the Source, Storage
Treatment and Supply.
 

The SEQ Water Grid Water Education program initiated two years ago has helped over  30,000 students from across the South East corner of Queensland to appreciate water and what it means to us all. One important part of the Learning Centres is the hands on water testing and sampling activities that schools can take part in as part of the World Water Monitoring Program. Every school that takes part in a learning activity has the opportunity to test water samples at or from a number of key sites across the region helping to develop a clearer picture of water quality and what we can do to ensure our continual access to it.

Twenty-five sites have been tested over the last two years providing valuable information for schools to work with, as well as understanding the importance of catchment management.

Melbourne

Standing at the edge of a small stream in Melbourne’s east, students from Antonio Park Primary School were asked the simple questions – “What can you see and what can you hear”.  “Cars, houses, birds, trees, rubbish, water, grass....” they had a wonderful and unique view of their local environment.

Over 3 weeks, 100 students between the ages of 8 and 10 measured the water quality in the Mullum Mullum Creek.  In small groups of 5, the water quality of the creek was measured, discussed and recorded.  The students were challenged to understand how the water quality might change following rain and during dry periods.  We looked for signs of aquatic life, water pollution and talked about how our lifestyle might impact on the water quality.  In the words of one of the students:

“I found out that the turbidity was 20JTU. That is not too bad but not really good. The temperature was colder than it should be. There was lots of rubbish in Mullum Mullum Creek. I had lots of fun.”
 

The Mullum Mullum Creek receives runoff from residential developments, natural bushland and a major road network.  It’s the foundation of a significant urban wildlife corridor which ultimately feeds into the Yarra River.  The heritage of the creek corridor was recognised and protected with a significant decision by the State Government of Victoria to route the nearby Eastlink through a tunnel thereby minimising environmental impact to the natural environment. The Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation are recognised as the traditional owners of the land around the Mullum Mullum Creek.  

Belarus

Minsk

On the 4th of November two enthusiasts from Minsk Linguistic College met in Gorky Park to monitor the Svisloch River in Minsk. We chose this place because we observed this river last year (under the name of Gymnasium 12) and we wondered if the characteristics were different. Unfortunately, we didn’t do it in October as usual. It was rather cold on that day but we managed to do all the tests and we were satisfied with the results.

We observed pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen and turbidity. The information was written down and later it was uploaded to the website. We made a conclusion that the Svisloch is quite clean and it is a good place for our birds and fish to live there. We are very grateful for the test kit which we received last year. To monitor the river was a great pleasure!

Slonim

On November 22, 2010, Slonim Gymnasium 1 in Belarus joined one of the greatest world’s events of preserving our nature – World Water Monitoring Day. A group of nine 6th graders – the most active ENO participants – and ENO Belarus coordinator, Irina Volynets, and chemistry teacher, Efrosinya Katsevich engaged in water monitoring activities. The participants were happy to be a part of WWMD as it was their first experience, which was very successful and unforgettable.  They plan on extending WWMD throughout the country.

WWMD celebrations started with the program Water for Life. The students were shown a presentation on water qualities and a few videos about the importance of water for nature and human beings. Then followed contests, quizzes and the discussion “What should we do to protect water resources?” Finally, the educators demonstrated and explained the testing procedures.

From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. the monitors surveyed two sites: Aginsky Canal and the Schara River, which had been selected for its proximity to the school and to each other. The Schara River is the main river on which the town of Slonim stands. Long ago it used to be one of the main waterways of the country but now it has become shallower. The Aginsky canal was built in the 18th century in the centre of the town. There is a town’s park on the bank of the canal. It runs into The Schara River. The students sampled the water of the Aginsky Canal in a nice place in the park not far from the bridge and also the water of the Schara River not far from the former town’s beach. Some human activities were noted along these water bodies such as fishing and feeding wild ducks which inhabit those sites.
The surveys at both sites included measurements for temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and turbidity. The results:

 


Water temperature

6-8º C

Water turbidity

0JTU

Quantity of dissolved oxygen in water (DO)

4ppm & 8ppm

pH

7

 

All the participants of WWMD activities realized the importance of keeping rivers and lakes clean and that a simple deed done by anyone can become a great commitment to the conservation of the environment.

Bolivia

The first World Water Monitoring Day activities in Bolivia were carried out in a small town near Sucre, the capital of Bolivia on October 22. Thirty 8th grade students from Domingo Savio public school joined the World Water Monitoring Day initiative.  As part of an environmental and hygiene campaign that the Ministry of Environment and Water leads all around the country with the support of GTZ/PROAPAC, the monitoring activities have been now included as a complement to reinforce the previous acquainted knowledge of elementary school children regarding the importance of taking care of water and hygiene. 

The students in Chuquisaca made the first test in Bolivia using the monitoring test kits provided by the World Water Monitoring Day program. The monitored site was the Avitero River, which is not contaminated with waste water, as many other rivers in Bolivia unfortunately are. Some bags and garbage were visible in the water and on the ground around the river which is not very abundant.  Three samples of the river were taken on different dates, one before rain season, the second and third after rain season, to see if any differences were distinctive. The temperature in the first test was 20°C and after the rain it raised to 24° and 22°. The measure for dissolved oxygen was 8ppm, but it lowered to 4 ppm in the second measurement and rose again to 8 ppm on the third test. A pH of 7 was registered on the first and third measurement and pH 8 at the second. Turbidity measured 40 JTU on all three measurements.

The monitoring activities are supported by GTZ but the school and the local water operator from the city of Sucre are actively involved, a meeting has been held to plan the activities for 2011, which include a visit to the water treatment plant to test the water before and after treatment. The activity has been so encouraging for children that teachers of this school are planning to include water quality as a theme in the subject “Life Sciences” next year.

Brazil

In October 2010, Professor Rosa Maria Sousa Santos along with 13 students at the State School Prof. Dinorá Pereira Ramos Brito participated in World Water Monitoring Day by testing Putins Creek in São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.

One of the biggest problems of the Putin’s Creek is the large volume of untreated water dumped into the stream. Once the natural purifying capacity is limited, the accumulation of organic matter produces an enormous consumption of oxygen, resulting in increased toxicity due to growth of undesirable algae and causing health risks to the population.

By monitoring the water, the students realized that the treatment of domestic sewage is a key strategic move in the neighborhood. Furthermore, reflecting on how to solve the water problems that involve the communities can be crucial and depends on the awareness of a future mobilization.

Participating in World Water Monitoring Day was important for us all, as we reflect on the actions needed to preserve water resources and the need to promote environmental education to students whose desires are related to the values of consumer culture. For change to happen, we need everyone to experience environmental practices.

Bulgaria

On World Water Day and until the end of the month, students in Yambol will test the water in the river Tundja in an action called “Students for a Cleaner River Tundja”. The Tundja surrounds the city of Yambol on three sides and many of
the city’s schools are located directly on the riverbank. Organized by the community foundation “Bridges Over Tundja”, this action includes students from 3 local schools. Participants will include 6th graders from the “Pierre du Coubertin” Sports School, 7th graders from “Atanas Radev” Mathematics Gymnasium, and 6th and 9th grade students from the Foreign Language School “Vasil Karagyozov”. Accompanied by their homeroom and biology teachers the students from each school will visit the river nearest them to test the water temperature, turbidity, pH levels, and oxygen levels of our river.

Water testing kits have been generously donated by the NGO “World Water Monitoring Day”, and each school will be given 2 kits containing enough chemicals for 100 tests. The three water monitoring sites will reveal much about how different uses of the river affect the water quality. The student’s water test results will be uploaded to the WWMD website, where the information will be combined with information from all over the world to gain a clearer picture of global water quality.


On March 22nd, students from the “Pierre du Coubertin” Sports School and the “Atanas Radev” Mathematics Gymnasium tested the water from the river near their schools. The weather was warm, the sun was out, and the fisherman looked on with amusement. Students from the Sports School proudly displayed their Water Monitoring Day stickersWhen the students from the Maths School were asked at the end of their testing how they thought the water quality was in the river, they replied “Terrible!” and then after a few laughs from the group one girl said, “No, really it’s not that bad.”

Burundi

On December 2, 2010, a community gathered together to participate in World Water Monitoring Day to test the Tanganyika Lake and also the Nyabagera River.

The results from Tanganyika Lake:

 

Air temperature

23C0

Water temperature

24C0

Water turbidity

0JTU

Quantity of dissolved oxygen in water (DO)

4ppm

pH

8

 

The results from Nyabagera River:

 

Air temperature

23C0

Water temperature

22C0

Water turbidity

0JTU

Quantity of dissolved oxygen in water (DO)

8ppm

pH

9

 

Chile

The first rays of sun together with the chilly breeze marked the beginning of our journey to the National Monument “Dos Lagunas (Two Lakes)”, located 20 km east of Coyhaique in the Aysen Region of Patagonia in Chile.

Snowy mountain sceneries, green meadows and tanned pastures welcomed us as we went into this vast natural territory. After about an hour away, we find the Laguna El Toro. To our surprise, we were unable to approach it because the terrain was steep and covered with grasses.

We didn’t get discouraged and went on towards our second destination. Surrounded by fences we found Laguna Escondida (Hidden Lake). We managed to enter and got closer to one edge. Manuela Pérez, a marine biologist, and Luis Pinto, oceanographer, took two samples with the WWMD kit yielding an interesting result. The strip thermometer marked zero and using a digital thermometer we measured below zero temperature of -0.4ºC. For the first time we were measuring semi frozen water. In fact, we could see the solid pieces of ice on the surface of the lake giving rise to liquid water when a stone was thrown.

Beginning at dusk, the sky was tinted blue to red as we departed. Before we reached the night, we stopped alongside the road to record the physico-chemical characteristics of a waterfall.

This expedition took place in June (winter in the Southern hemisphere) allowing us to delve a little deeper into the mysteries of the water cycle as we traveled in the Chilean Patagonia.


China

Hong Kong

This is the seventh consecutive year that Water Supplies Department has organised World Water Monitoring Day in Hong Kong. With a view to educating the public about water as a precious resource and encouraging the wise use of water, World Water Monitoring Day was held in conjunction with the Ceremony for Launching of Water Conservation Design Competition on 18 September 2010. 100 secondary school students from Semple Memorial Secondary School were invited to assemble at Tai Lam Chung Reservoir and carried out tests on the quality of water sampled on site.

The programme started with a clear demonstration by two chemists from Water Supplies Department regarding the test procedure. Students were then divided into small groups and each group was required to conduct three sampling tests by the use of a standard test kit. With the guidance of teachers and chemists, test results including temperature, acidity (pH), clarity (turbidity in JTU) and dissolved oxygen (DO in ppm) from each group were successfully submitted to our chemists for consolidation and analysis.

The test results showed that the surface water from Tai Lam Chung Reservoir reached the temperature of 34 ℃ high. The average values of pH and dissolved oxygen level of water were 7 and 8 ppm respectively while the turbidity stayed at 0 JTU in general. In conclusion, the quality of this raw water source was free from serious pollution.

Selected photos of the event are available in the Photo Gallery.

Shanghi

On October 16th, 2010, our World Water Monitoring Day activity was organized for the first time at the Shanghai office.  17 children, between 9-14 years old, were invited by our employees.

After sorting through different sites and completing safety inspections, Shanghai Changfeng Park was selected as the location for conducting World Water Monitoring Day testing, where the body of water was approximately 143000 hectares. With help from our volunteers, Maggie Yin and Carrie Zhao, the children were divided into four groups. Following IS consultant Vivian Chan’s demonstration, the children noted the results of the four indicators: pH, Dissolved Oxygen, Turbidity and Temperature.  Most of them learned for the first time how these indicators impacted water quality and they also showed great interest to do this outdoor practice themselves. Two water samples were tested and recorded for comparison.

This was a successful event with good feedback from the children. They were educated to care more about water and the environment we live in. And they also were proud of the company their parents work for.


Congo

As ENO Coordinator of CONGO RC, we have conducted the monitoring in Congo RC for WWMD 2010. The APEDJ/AFEYD (Association Pour l'Environnement et Développement de la Jeunesse/Association For Environment and Youth Development) did participate in the event. Here are the results:

Date: December 5th, 2010
Site name: Ecole la médiane
Country: Congo RC
City: Brazzaville
Air temp: 24
Turbidity: 40JTU
% of saturation: 95
Water temp: 30
DO: 8ppm
PH: 7

One part of information has been sent to the water and education Ministries of Congo so that they take part to the next event upcoming in 2011.

Many schools and groups including some authorities of education and water will take part to the event in 2011. Here’s what we project:
Number of People who will take part: 50; Age: 18-35

Also, this information comes from the ENO National coordinator of CONGO RC called  Mr. Roll Matifath BOUESSO, the school la Médiane did participate in WWMD 2010. Our wish is to extend the WWMD in Congo with other schools in association with ENO National Coordinator. The results of the monitoring tests: Turbidity: 0 JTU; DO: 4 ppm; Water temp: 26°C; PH: 6% of saturation: 20°C.

Cuba

Pinar del Río

La playa Blanca Arena esta situada en el municipio de  Bahía Honda en la provincia Pinar del Río.

En dicha playa se realizo un estudio para conocer la turbidez del agua y se pudo constatar que es de 40 JTU, la temperatura  de 28 grados el PH de 9 y la oxigenación de 4PPM, todo esto es debido a que la población arroja desechos a la orilla de la playa como son latas de refresco, pomos , bolsas plásticas, papeles , pero además también allí esta ubicada una pequeña base de pesca y estas lanchas arrojan los desechos de petróleo lo que trae consigo una gran contaminación del agua, por lo que es desfavorable para la vida de los animales y plantas que allí viven como es el caso de un criadero de ostiones  que se esta  extinguiendo debido a estas negligencias    “una  especie tan preciada a nivel internacional”.

Acciones: 

Colocar murales ecológicos a la orilla de la playa.
Creación de Círculos de interés en la escuela enmarcada en la comunidad.
Realizar conversatorios con los pobladores sobre el cuidado y la protección del medio ambiente.
Festejar el día del medio ambiente.
Efectuar talleres con los propietarios de las lanchas sobre el cuidado del medio ambiente.
Realizar monitoreo por la playa cada 15 días. 
Realizar limpieza cada 15 días por la orilla de la playa.
Que  los propietarios de la base de pesca sistemáticamente le den mantenimiento a las lanchas para evitar escape de petróleo para que no se contamine el agua.

Sandino

On December 5, 2010 a collaborator of the Cuba GSA team, BCh. Yosvany Diaz Baños, monitored the waters of the Guadiana River in Sandino, 74 km from Pinar Del Río, the capital city of the western province of Cuba.

Baños carried out the WWMD diagnosis with nine children – all who were motivated by the impact of these waters in the community nearby. Some time ago, Baños noticed that this river was becoming more shaded in colour. As soon as he met the Cuba GSA captain and his WWMD kit he just asked this device to let know the inhabitants of his town the real state of the waters.

It is important to declare that all the people of Sandino depend on this river somehow, including our children and athletes who consume the water to practice their physical activity. The Air Temperature was 26 C. Turbidity: 40JTU, Water Temperature; 24 C, PH: 7 and the DO ( Oxygen in the water) is 0PPM.

In conclusion, this study confirmed that the waters have been damaged by a pig breeding development near the river. Despite all this unfortunate results there are optimistic views after the recent construction of an oxidation pond to filter the acid pig waste to the river.

 

Ecuador

Ecuador. With the coordination of Riobamba's Water Company-Empresa Municipal de Agua Potable y Alcantarillado (EMAPAR) and the assistance of the NGO EcoCiencia (Fundación Ecuatoriana de Estudios Ecológicos). The students from the local high school—Colegio Maldonado, and the university UNIDEC participated in the World Water Monitoring Day 2010.

Monitoring took place at Río Chimborazo and Río Chibunga which run along Riobamba city. These rivers flow from high altitude grasslands (páramos) to andean valleys. Río Chimborazo's origin is the glacier melting off of the highest volcano in Ecuador—Chimborazo (6310 meters above sea level). In the upper part of these watersheds, the streams are used for crop’s irrigation of potato, wheat, and onions by indigenous communities. The water quality of the Río Chimborazo and río Chibunga is damaged once these streams run along Riobamba. Untreated sewage are released to these streams. Turbidity over 100 JTU is one of the outstanding findings, showing large amount of sediments running in these streams. pH is alkaline with values around 8.

EMAPAR has decided to start an environmental education program for all Riobamba citizens called “Amigos por el agua”-“Water friends”. The World Water Monitoring Day is part of the activities that EMAPAR is doing for protecting water resources and educating people about water importante for cities.

Finland

“First water was yellow but now it’s turquoise!” whoops an eager ten-year old school boy. He has successfully measured water's pH and found water of local river Vantaa as neutral. All of the fifth grade pupils got approximately the same measurement, varying from 7 to 8.5.

A co-operation project for 11 to 13 year-old school children called "Water Route" started in Helsinki, Finland, in mid-September. The idea of the Water Route is to invite school classes to explore water from different aspects in three various places: in Heureka science centre and in the Museum of Technology, and finally at Viikinmäki water treatment plant.

Along the Water Route, children analyse plankton, go back in time before the water pipes were invented, make fishing equipment of their own and explore water samples taken from the river Vantaa. The first pilot groups saw at least copepods and daphnias through the microscope and decorated their fishing lures with stickers that glow in dark. The children also analyzed the colour and opacity of the water. The group came to the conclusion that the water is relatively clean and clear. However, no one wanted to taste slightly brownish water straight from the river!

There were 21 children that took part in the first excursion of the Water Route. By the end of the year, another five classes will complete the same adventure. The co-operation will continue next year with six groups of seventh-grade pupils.

HSY Water, producing drinking water and treating wastewater in great Helsinki region, is one of the partners in the operation. It is part of HSY Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority, which is a regional authority providing environmental services for residents and companies in the Helsinki area. The organisation also organises guided tours for school classes and to visit the treatment plants. 
 

Georgia

Georgian Association of Educational Initiatives and the third-year ENO Club joined together for World Water Monitoring Day. ENO Club’s members learned about the environment and how to protect it from damage.

On the 28th of November, 10 members of ENO Club and SIQA and ENO Country Coordinator, Pavle Tvaliashvili, visited City Park to test the water. The selected sites were Mtkvari River (Kura), two small lakes and drinking water from a fountain. It was a warm and windy day, the sun was shining, and the temperature was about 200C.

First, the participants received information about the testing procedure. Last year, some participants had already measured water quality and were now sharing their knowledge and experience with beginners.

The Mtkvari River (Kura) is the biggest river in Georgia. It is streaming from Turkey, over half country, and it travels towards Azerbaijan into the Caspian Sea. City Rustavi is the last big inhabited place and the river is more polluted. In our case, testing the river’s water is very interesting and important.

The test results showed that the water of Mtkvari (Kura) River reached the temperature of 140C low. The acidity (PH) and dissolved oxygen level of water were 7 pH and 3 ppm, respectively, while the clarity stayed at 40 JTU. It can be concluded from these results that the water was free from serious pollution.

In observing the lakes in the park, one of them was clearer (0 JTU) than the other (40 JTU), but both had the same acidity – 8 pH. They had different dissolved oxygen (4ppm and 2ppm). The drinking water’s test results were the following: clarity – 0 JTU, dissolved oxygen – 4 ppm, acidity – 6 pH.

This World Water Monitoring Day was very important because children got to experience something new, received new skills and new knowledge of testing water’s quality. Additionally, it was an educational activity, which raised their awareness in protecting water resources. The young kids realized how important it is for life to maintain the ecosystem. They already know that healthy water is a healthy environment.

Dmanisi

The students of summer camp in Dmanisi decided to join the WWMD program. They went on a hike to the bank of river Mashavera on July 12, 2010. The source of the river is in Javakheti mountains and it flows through Dmanisi region.The students and the teachers talked about importance of fresh water and about WWMD program. Then they made a water analysis with WWMD water testing kit. The sample was taken at the former shooting-range. Now it is a recreational area. It was late evening (20:30), the sky was clear, air temperature was 24°C, water temperature was 19° C, DO was 4ppm, and pH was 7.

The participants didn't make the special macroinvertibrates observation, but it was late evening and it was impossible to overlook a great number of midges on the bank. The students know (from prior experience), that there are trout in the river.
 

Tbilisi

The graduate students of the primary school "Mertskhali" in Tbilisi, Georgia arranged a trip to the historical site Dzalisa, near city Mtskheta. They had their water monitoring day on the river Narekvavi near the remains of old city. That day (June 20)  the weather was fine, but the day before it had heavy rain. The turbidity of the water was high - it was impossible to observe the Secchi disk on the bottom of the jar. The air temperature at 13:30 was 26°C, the temperature of the water was 24°C; DO was 8ppm, and pH level was 7. The students used the test kit donated by WWMD. Five students and three teachers took part in water monitoring.

 

Honduras

The event was held just up river from the town of Santa Barbara Honduras in Central America. The water body was a river approximately 6-10 meters wide and quickly flowing. The name of the river is Rio Frio.

The event was held on the 18th of September 2010 by me and fellow Peace Corps Volunteers. The total number of participants was five (5).  There were several samples of water tested. Enough samples were taken to fill the entire data sheet.  The tests performed were Air temp (33 C), Turbidity (70), Water Temp (23 C), DO (3) and PH (8.5).  Only one water body was tested.  The site appeared to be fairly clean and well forested.  This site was chosen do to its proximity to the city of Santa Barbara. It was within walking distance just outside of the city on the road that leads to La Zona. One of the memorable quotes from a participant was, “we should do this up in my community with the school kids.” 

» Back to Top 

India

NEER Foundation has lifted the torch, to spread the light of knowledge, making people aware about the water quality and its importance. This has been achieved though an association with the World Water Monitoring Day program last year. This programme is globally being run by International Water Association (UK) and World Environment Federation, Netherland. It is worthwhile to mention here that the organization was also awarded with the Water Champion Award 2009 for its successful achievements through the programme. According to Raman Tyagi, Director of the Foundation, “this year NEER Foundation has managed to spread the programme, both geographically and also in terms of involvement of students and people”. This year, sites from 30 districts have been covered and samples are those of rivers, ponds, lakes and other similar water resource. The samples were tested at the locations and the results were noted. Another milestone achieved is that of about 4000 students of 30 different schools and around 1000 social workers of different civil society organizations and institutions becoming a part of the programme. The participation proportion ranged from rural to urban, male to female and students belonging to the marginalized and poorest sections of the society.


Through the World Water Monitoring Day programme, the organization feels that it has been able to make efforts to bring our history to life and this has been supported by masses especially children, contributing in their own ways by understanding the sensitivity of the issue and co-operate in its journey towards a better tomorrow because the journey of a 1000 miles starts with a step. This testing programme was a step in the direction.

KolKata

The Nature Club at Birla High School KolKata, India has been very active this quarter. For the past month we have concentrated on the need to conserve water bodies and conserve water in general.  We flagged off the event with a Special assembly where a Power Point presentation was shown to the boys. An oath was taken by all the members of the school that we would do anything within our power to conserve water. The students made posters and placards and walked round the adjoining streets speaking to students and teachers of nearby schools office goers, vendors, street hawkers, bank employees about the need to conserve our natural resources specially water.

We monitored Victoria Square a small water body near our school. People use it to wash their linen, bathe clean their taxis and carelessly throw plastic bottles and bags in the pond and park. However with our school taking keen interest and the alumni of the school working for it, has become a better place these days.

The Water Monitoring was conducted on the 15th of December 2010. Our Headmistress, Mrs.Mehrotra, Mr. Joydeep Kundu, an ardent Naturalist three teachers / facilitators of the nature club- Ms. Pandher, Ms. Sunil, Ms. Rajan was present along with 57 students.

No. of participants - 57
No. Of sites monitored - 1
No. of Samples taken - 2
Turbidity - 100 JTU
DO - 4ppm
pH - 8-9

By and large the water body was an unkempt place with rubbish thrown all around. Yet it is a major source of water, washing and cooking for the people of the slums nearby. This time the water was less polluted because now a local body has taken up the cause and fish are being bred here. Though slushy, the place teemed with centipedes, millipede, butterflies, squirrels, cormorants’ kingfisher, mynah, rats etc. yet the skeletons of crow and rats that we saw made us wonder about the quality of water. Like one of our boys said to the bank manager, “People take so much trouble to save money in your bank, why can they not take the trouble to save and conserve water?”

Meerut

Janhit Foundation is committed to sharing and protecting our community’s water ecosystem and encourages citizens to learn more about protecting our valuable water resources. World Water Monitoring Day is an excellent initiative designed to promote education and personal stewardship. Janhit Foundation have a rich history of working on water related issues, we are currently running a program called “Water Literacy on Wheels” and have a rain Centre in Meerut. We also recently took part in World Water Day organizing seminars and awareness events in Meerut and Ghaziabad.

Meerut is a city situated in western Uttar Pradesh. We are in the Doab region situated between the rivers Ganga and Yamuna. The area was renowned for fertile agricultural land and water abundance. Presently there is a water crisis due to excessive extraction of groundwater for sugarcane production and chemicals entering the water table. Surface water bodies are also heavily polluted.

Janhit Foundation joined with thousands of volunteers across the globe to sample water quality and report its findings. We had a world water day celebration in Meerut and in the following months carried out testing throughout our working region.

The monitoring activities are easy and engaging. We performed tests for dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity (clarity) and temperature. We engaged with a wide audience from different areas of Uttar Pradesh. We tested ground water, ponds, streams and a river called Kali Nadi that now lives up to its name as the black river and not its historical belief that it cures coughs.

While engaged in this event, we got the participants looking and examining their own water bodies. The facilitated the groups by describing what each test meant and what affected the results. We were able to discuss the lowering water table, how chemicals were polluting the groundwater. We explained sanitation, and how potable drinking water can easily become contaminated. We talked about what fish other creatures that live in water bodies need to live. The groups generally were quite aware of water issues and they discussed corrective and preventive measures to improve the situation.

Indonesia

This December was the month for water monitoring at Junior High School AL FIKRI. This month we had three water monitoring day events. The first was at our school event, “Green Day”, on December 15-16th. The second was conducted on our expedition trip to Dragon Village at Tasikmalaya on 19-20th December 2010, and the third was conducted in Depok. At the first and second events, students got the main role; the third water monitoring was conducted by our beloved teachers.

Water monitoring was conducted in two different places: Jatijajar swamp and Kalong swamp. Both of those swamps are located in Depok city, West Java- Indonesia. Those swamps actually become one of the recreation places in Depok. Citizens usually go to the swamp to go fishing or to just enjoy the swamp. Both of the swamps are also located near to residential areas and the main road. Below are our results:

Jatijajar Swamp 
Jatijajar swamp was our first monitoring site. At this location, water monitoring was conducted by two people, lead by Miss Lita. The Jatijajar swamp is located not far from the main road of Depok- Bogor.

After testing the water, we found out that swamp Jatijajar had 0 JTU turbidity, 7 pH and 8ppm DO. This result is different from Kalong swamp. Jatijajar swamp is more often used as a water recreation place in Depok. This swamp is also located near a villager homes.

Kalong swamp
The kalong swamp or as we used to call it, “Rawa Kalong” is located in Cimanggis, Depok City-Indonesia. The water monitoring was conducted on 19th December 2010, by three people, which was lead by our social teacher, Miss Reni.

We found out that water in “Rawa Kalong” had turbidity 100 JTU, it looks green and not too clear. Water pH had a range between the color chart of 8-9, DO was 8ppm and the water temperature had a range between 28-30 °C.

According to people who live near the swamp, there a small soap factory close to the swamp. The factory activity is not too big, but it might explain why the water has a pH between 8 and 9. In the swamp, we also see many “eceng gondok (Eichhornia crassipes)” in the surface. Before, the plant covered the swamp’s surface exactly in the center, but then people cleaned the plants onto the edge of the swamp. So now the swamp surface can be seen clearly. Some small animals that can be found there are fish, worms and little shrimp; we thought shrimp appear because the swamp used to be a shrimp fishpond. According to the people, birds appears sometimes as well.

Raden Saleh Sukmajaya

WWMD was held on 15-16th December, at Junior High School Al-Fikri at Raden Saleh Sukmajaya, Depok West Java – Indonesia.  Monitoring water has become one of the activities that are included in the Green Day event with our theme of “Better Water for Better Life.”

The water monitoring was conducted on the second day, Thursday, 16th December. Almost 160 students and teachers, including 90 junior high students, 66 sixth grade elementary students and 10 teachers participated in the event.

Not all the students participated directly in testing the water. Several students were able to test the water at the source and other students took samples of the water to be tested at school by their other friends. We did this because we couldn’t provide the all students with the opportunity to go to the water body, but we wanted all of them to have the same experience in monitoring the water.

We tested four different local water sources in Depok city: Jatijajar swamp, Rawa Belong, Cilodong and Rawa Besar. Additionally, all students were asked to bring a sample of their soil water from their house to be tested and compared with other student’s samples and with the local water sources. We are planning to make a simple map on Depok water quality based on the monitoring results. We also plan to send the results to the local government as one suggestion on environment conservation.  

All students were very enthusiastic about the monitoring water activities. They looked excited to place pH and DO tablets in the water and to observe what color would appear. Some of the students discovered that the water from their homes was acidic while others were not or that they had a neutral pH. Most of the results showed a DO at 4 ppm. Overall, the water that was tested had a pH range of 6 – 8. For those students who had results indicating poor water quality, we asked them to analyze what might have caused that – whether they were contaminated or if the water had been mixed with other chemicals. At the end of the activity, all the students wrote down their observation results with simple graphics, tables and pictures.

The students’ results may not be an accurate measurement, but one thing is for sure – the students learned to watch their water. By doing this activity, we hoped students could get knowledge, not only about the criteria of good water but also the quality of water that they used in daily life. We also hope that by monitoring their water, they will figure out by themselves whether their water is good or not. And if they had a lack of quality water, we hope they can make observations about what could cause it and that they would be encouraged to take action in order prevent their water issues. Right now, the report of this activity can be read in AL FIKRI bulletin as a report to the parents and community.

Tasikamalaya

What would cross your mind if you heard of a village that was located on a hill? I bet you would guess that the village might have mud slides. You might also think that villagers are at high risk of an earthquake. But the opposite is happening in Dragon Village in Tasikamalaya, West Java, Indonesia. 

Dragon Village is one of the beautiful and traditional villages that have been constantly under conservation for their natural environment. The village is located on the main road that is also connected to Tasikmalaya and Garut city in West Java, Indonesia. The area of dragon village is less than 4 ha.

The villager or as they used to be called, “dragon people” have local wisdom that has been passed down from one generation to the next generation. They have strict rule on living together with their nature. They are not allowed to take anything from their two main forests, called forbidden forests. They also have a rule on cutting down trees and they also have special construction rules for their houses. If they cut one tree, they must replace it by planting two trees. They do this, not only because they are very aware that they live in high risk ‘hilly’ land, but also because they want to protect the nature for their next generation. They believe nature can fulfill all their needs if they live balanced and maintain sustainability. That way, even though the village located on a hill, the villager has never slid down; even when a big Tasikmalaya earthquake happened there was no damage to any house in Dragon Village.

Dragon village became an AL FIKRI expedition destination on 19-20th December 2010. This observation activity is part of a project called “From Naga to The Earth”, which became one of the projects on Asia Europe Classroom (AEC). The dragon team observes and monitors water quality of two sources: their water source for daily life and the Ciwulan river that flows in the village. Below are the results:

Parameter 

Result 

Ciwulan River 

Water source for daily life 

PH

7

7

DO

8 ppm

8 ppm

Temperature

28

28

Turbidity

0 JTU

0 JTU

Saturation

41 %

41 %

Animal that found

Fish

Fish

 
According to one of the elders there, there are two amazing things about their natural water source:

  1. The water debit in the dry season and wet season is constant. There is no change between dry season and wet season; the water source flows in the same volume. Therefore the dragon village always has water, never dry.
  1. The water from water source can be drunk (consumed) directly without being boiled first. According to the elder, one of the requirements where water can be drunk directly is that it has to have constant debit of the water source in dry and wet season. The elder also said that there are two universities that have tested it and proved that it really is drinkable water. Although the facts prove that the water can be drunk directly, the villagers still boil it first before consumption.

Based on that data, we analyze that the water in dragon village has better quality than water in our city. It tasted good, smelled good and it was more fresh and colder than the water in the city.

This observation data will be reported on our project website and will be announced to other schools in Europe and Asia. We are hoping that other students in other countries can find their own local wisdom, or their own “dragon village” – traditional culture that’s suitable with modern life and can be applied to prevent damage to our environment, our beloved earth. This project will provide students with the opportunity to share their local wisdom and learn positive things from each other. In Indonesia, we have Baduy and Naga tradition, and maybe Ainu tradition, Indian, Aborigine or other. We hope you all will join us.

 

Macedonia

Chashka

Students from Todor Janev’s science club participated in this year’s world water project. We tested water from 4 different sites in our area. The first test site was from a spring in a village, Melnica, in the surrounding mountains. We found this water to be the cleanest, with a dissolved oxygen saturation percentage to be at 71%, turbidity to be 0, and the pH to be 7.0. After that we measured the water from the river that is fed by the spring in Melnica. The river had a dissolved oxygen saturation percentage of 68% which is fair quality, turbidity of 4, and a pH of 8.0. Next we went to another village in-between Chashka and Melnica. It is lower elevation and we measured from the village’s major tap source. The dissolved oxygen saturation percentage was 74%, turbidity was 0, and the pH was 6.0. Finally we measured the school tap water, which comes from the same source as the rest of the village of Chashka. The dissolved oxygen saturation percentage was the lowest at 41%, the turbidity was 0, and the pH was at 6. Overall we found the water to be of good quality in every test site. The students are presenting this information to the entire school and will talk about ways to keep the water clean and drinkable for all living beings in our immediate environment.  The students are also preparing a video in Spanish to send to the Lincoln School in Costa Rica.   

Gostivar

Thirty eighth grade students from Mustafa Kemal Ataturk primary school in Gostivar, Macedonia tested the Vardar River’s water on Friday, November 12, 2010 as part of their biology class.  This event allowed the students to participate in World Wide Monitoring Day and to add Gostivar, Macedonia to the water testing map. They preformed multiple tests on the water in the Vardar River, a local river whose source is five kilometers outside of town.  Testing was done on the Vardar’s water because it is the main source of water in town as well as throughout many other cities in Macedonia.  The students collected two water samples from the same location in the Vardar River, and they came up with identical results for the following tests: turbidity, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH.  The site of the testing was in the center of town, and the air temperature at the time of testing was 16 degrees Celsius.  The results of the tests were that the turbidity of the water was 40JTU, the pH was 7, the water temperature was 12 degrees Celsius and the dissolved oxygen was 8ppm causing the percent saturation to be 74.  The students discovered that the Vardar water is semi-suitable for aquatic life based on the above tests.  However, they realized that the water could be cleaner and that different tests may indicate that there are additional issues with the cleanliness of the water.  The students enjoyed the experiment because it directly related to them and their city.  The event caused them to reflect on the harm that polluting and throwing garbage into the river can cause.  Hopefully the students will pass on their newfound knowledge to their family and friends so that the Vardar River will become a cleaner river in future years. 

Tetovo

The American Corner Tetovo Kids Club tested water in two sites, the river Tetovo and the Banja. The Banja is a popular spring, which people bathe in and drink from. The kids tested the water, and then made posters about what they discovered and presented them to the mayor. They found that the water had high dissolved oxygen level, was in both cases basic, and they theorized that all the garbage in both locations was the cause. The local media also covered the event. 

Vasilevo

The science teacher at Goce Delchev Elementary School in Vasilevo enthusiastically participated in WWMD.  There is no science classroom or supplies for the school, so it was a welcome change to do something beyond the textbook.  Better yet, the town mayor (a microbiologist who worked in the hospital lab before assuming his exalted position) heard about the project and decided to donate additional supplies!  The local official responsible for water testing was also invited to the school event.  The students enjoyed the hands-on activity and the teacher hopes to do similar activities in the future. 

 

Malaysia

A total of 200 secondary school students participated in the World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) held on 9th November 2010 at Hutan Bandar Putra in Kulaijaya, Johor.  The event was organized by local agencies to educate the children on the importance of preserving water quality.  The collaborating agencies were Iskandar Regional Development Authority (IRDA), Kulaijaya District Office and SAJ Holdings Sdn, Bhd. (SAJH).  SAJH is water operator responsible for delivering potable water to 3.2 million people in Johor.  The Malaysia Water Association (MWA), the main water NGO contributed water testing kits for use.   
  

Hutan Bandar Putra was chosen because it is one of the important sources for Skudai water treatment plant.  The students were briefed by SAJH’s chemist on water collecting and testing procedure.  Led by a moderator, the students then conducted the monitoring exercise in a group of 10.  200 samples were collected that day with test results including water temperature, turbidity, pH level and dissolved oxygen were recorded. 

Average reading collected on the water temperature was 30˚C, turbidity remained at 40 JTU, pH was recorded at 6 and dissolved oxygen 4ppm.

The weather was cloudy that day but that didn’t damper the students to enjoy themselves with this outdoor activity.  Mohd Ikmal Bustamin from SMK Bandar Putra was quoted saying “It’s not everyday we get to do this, so this is a good excuse to play with water while learning new things”.

The event, which was officiated by Mr. Tan Kok Hong, Exco of International Trade and Industry; Energy, Water and Communications, ended on a high note around noon.

 

Morocco

Students of the Taïmount School in Rabat, Morocco participated in World Water Monitoring Day activities on November 2 with the National Office of Drinking Water.  They conducted their testing in a large laboratory and then reported their data to the WWMD database.  Click here to view the students’ report.

 

Pakistan

On World Water Day March 22, 2010 where world is participating globally with a message “clean water for a healthy world” Mr. Rangeen Khan along with his friends carried out a program  to monitor a site and contribute their effort for water with the support of World Water Monitoring Day, who donated water kits, and Social Mobilization Unit Swabi.

Water is essential for all socio-economic development and for maintaining healthy ecosystems. As population increases and development calls for increased allocations of groundwater and surface water for the domestic, agriculture and industrial sectors, the pressure on water resources intensifies, leading to tensions, conflicts among users, and excessive pressure on the environment.

By 2025, 1 800 million people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity, and two-thirds of the world population could be under stress conditions.

Addressing water scarcity requires actions at local, national and international levels, leading to increased collaboration between nations on shared management of water resources. Access to clean drinking water is critical for the health of children around the world. An estimated 425 million children under the age of 18 continue to face water shortages.  Women and girls are often tasked with fetching water, putting extra pressure on their well being.


The situation found as it is discussed in “Nogram”, is a small village round about one thousand household of District Buneer having a distance of 40 km to North from Swabi. Local students of Nogram guided team members to a spring from where a depressive community fetching water for their daily use very hardly using Donkey and other animals. The purpose of the program was to attract attention of the Nogram community to their local water resource problems, to involve them in the water resources protection process, and to train them in the simplest methods of measuring water quality's main indicators.

The weather was clear and without clouds in Nogram. Water was collected in a jar and the result showed that air temperature was 32° C, water temperature was 28°C, turbidity was 100 JTU, DO was 4 PPM and pH was 7 recorded.

More than 100 participants from local community participated on the occasion. 

Philippines

Iligan City

Pursuant to DepeD Memorandum No. 491 dated December 3, 2010, the Department of Education celebrates Education Week nationwide with the theme: “Edukasyon Tungo sa Tapat na Pagbabago  at Pag-uunlad”. The celebration aims to: 1. Reaffirm and emphasize the role of education in empowering and developing the young to become productive citizens of the country and responsive to the needs of times; 2. Strengthen cooperation among stakeholders in education to support the necessary and significant changes to achieve quality and relevant education; and 3. inspire every educator to do more for the school children to ensure their future.

In response to the above objectives, twenty four (24) ICEHS-Hinaplanon teachers with a team of nineteen (19) students decided to conduct water monitoring at Mandulog River in Iligan City. The river is one of the biggest rivers in the city. Residential houses were found along the river banks. Mining sand and gravel are the most common activities along the banks. It was also observed that people living beside the river used the river as garbage area and even some have their toilets built directly to the river. The river was also used as an outlet in all household water waste. Dividing the group, the One (1) team covered 3 sites and the other team, 4 sites.  There were also two (2) shallow wells monitored in between the old and new bridge which is the source of water of the residents living at the river banks. Before the end of the activity, the group covered seven (7) important sites.

The group was headed by Dr. Sherlita L. Daguisonan who brought along with her the water monitoring kit of WEF and IWA given by Mr. Kalaimani Supramaniam during the International conference on Earth Care Campaign 2010-2014 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia last November 21-26, 2010.

At the end of the activity, teachers and students realized why they should place concern on water sources. Water's necessity does not end only with humans. In fact  it  is a part of most living organisms.

 

Muntinlupa City

Two separate monitoring activities were conducted by SCPW for its participation to the WWMD for 2010. The first water monitoring activity was conducted last 11 March, during the 3-day Ecological Camp for the youth of Muntinlupa City, which was held on 10-12 March 2010. The ecocamp was attended by 25 high school students and 3 science advisers from various schools of Muntinlupa City including 2 youth from the Sangguniang Kabataan (local youth council). The 10 participating schools were: Christ the King School of Muntinlupa, Colegio de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, Living Light Academy, Muntinlupa Business High School, Muntinlupa Cosmopolitan School, Muntinlupa Institute of Technology, Muntinlupa National High School, Muntinlupa National High School – Annex,Muntinlupa Science High School and Pedro E. Diaz High School.

The 3-day camp was sponsored by the Universal Parcel Service (UPS) in partnership with SCPW, Unilever Phils., LLDA and the City Government of Muntinlupa.

The second water monitoring activity took place last 30 September during a 3-day Ecological Camp in the Municipality of San Pedro in the Province of Laguna. The eco-camp, held  last Sept 29- Oct 01, was participated by 27 students and 2 science advisers from 4 secondary schools, namely, San Pedro Relocation Center National High School Cuyab Campus, San Pedro Relocation Center National High School Landayan Campus, Sampaguita National High School and Liceo de San Pedro. 

The eco-camp was sponsored by a tripartite partnership called CLEAR (Conservation of Laguna de Bay’s Environment and Resources), which membership is consists of SCPW, Unilever-Philippines and the Laguna Lake Development Authority (LLDA). CLEAR worked in partnership with the Local Government of San Pedro in the 3-day activity.

Both activities were conducted in Laguna de Bay within approximately 1km away from the shores of San Pedro and Muntinlupa. Two stations were established per site and 5 samples (and temperature levels) were taken per station, while the participants took turns to test the samples for levels of DO, pH and tubidity using the La Motte kits. Samples were also tested using digital instruments by LLDA.  Back in the camp, results were processed and analyzed based on the field observations.

Laguna de Bay is located in the heart of Metropolitan Manila.  It is the largest inland body of water in the Philippines and the third largest in Southeast Asia. Laguna de Bay is a multipurpose water resource to 8.4 million people residing in the Bay Region. An estimated 60% of this population is responsible for directly dumping their waste into the lake.

San Pedro and Munitnlupa are only two (2) of the 26 municipalities and 4 cities along the 285 Km shoreline of Laguna de Bay. Both are densely populated with local settlements encroaching the buffer zones along the shorelines of Laguna de Bay. Other activities such as industrial, commercial, agricultural, poultry-raising, fishpen culture are also widespread.

Student participants find the experience as an “eye-opener” and a renewal of their commitment as the “young stewards” of the lake and its environment.  After the camp, participants went back to their schools and communities with their identified projects that will translate their plans into concrete actions to conserve the Laguna de Bay.

 

Romania

Cheia

Wanting to make a difference regarding our environmental, this year we were again involved in the World Water Monitoring Day programme. Along with our teacher, Doina Munteanu, and several other students from Colegiul National Mircea cel Batran, we went to collect water samples for our project.

The event was held on the 28th of October in Constanta County near Cheia. With three water samples collected from Casimcea River, our 26 students started monitoring it step-by-step. Our results were similar to those from last year: water’s temperature: 8C; overall temperature in Constanta was 12 Celsius; turbidity: 100 JTU; pH: 7; oxygen: 4 ppm.

Water Monitoring Day has underlined the fact that everyone should do something about the environmental problems, so our students were more than thrilled to take part in such an amazing experience.Every year we meet many teenagers who unlike others, show devotion in what they do. Seeing them so involved in serious matters of today’s society makes us think that we are not alone in this. Media and local newspapers have noticed our action and started spreading a positive message about it. Furthermore many of them think that “we should be a part of the solution and not a part of the problem”.Obviously, over the years this has become the most important site regarding water monitoring, and that’s why we have chosen it. At the same time, we are willing to take part in this project every year, because after all our few little steps will make a big difference in this unknown, grey future.

 

Galati

"In nature there is no rewards, no punishments, only consequences."
(Vladimir Prelog - Nobel Prize winner in chemistry)

Water is a substance that is essential to life. Without water one cannot conceive any form of life. Starting from this conclusion, some students from School 2 Galati, Romania, have been implied in monitoring the water quality of the large river Danube, its tributary river Siret and the smaller river Chineja.

It has to be said that this is the third year that the students of this school have monitored the water bodies around their city, each year adding one more river. Galati is surrounded by water: three rivers, a big lake and a few other small water bodies.

The activities had objectives to form and develop students' responsibility to protect the environment. Different samples of water have been analyzed with the help of the monitoring test kits. In June and September, teams of students accompanied and guided by teachers Ioana Alecu, Viorica Calugaru and Georgiana Munteanu, went to river Chineja. They determined some water parameters, cleaned the river banks, planted trees and gave the people in the community flyers with ecological messages.

In September and October, other groups of students guided by teacher Viorica Cortojan analyzed the water of the Danube and the Siret rivers. On the banks of these rivers there was no solid waste.

The water had no smell, no color and it contained small sand particles. In that period no oil traces have been detected.
The students were very interested and happy about these activities.

The results of the water monitoring are shown in the table below:

 

The water body 

Date 

Air Temp  

DO  

pH  

The Chineja (small river)

20 June 2010

22

4

8

The Chineja

25 Sept 2010

16

3

8

The Danube (very big river)

24 Sept 2010

17

6

7.5

The Danube

22 Oct 2010

9

7

8

The Siret (tributary of the Danube river)

30 Sept 2010

18

6

7.5

The Siret

15 Oct 2010

11

7

7.5

 

 

Hunedoara

The students from our school made measurements in the four villages belonging to the Baru villages (Crivadia, Petros, Livadia and Baru) from where they commute to our school. This year we involved the kindergarten and primary students more than the older students.

Scoala Generala Petros-Baru, located in a village in Hunedoara, made measurements on November 2010. 92 students took part in this event, collecting 100 samples from four different bodies of water: the Barisor River, Strei River, Muncel River and Crivedia River.

The surrounding areas of the rivers are mainly agricultural. While the water is mostly clean and clear, we noticed that, comparing to last year, we haven’t found so much trash which had been thrown in the rivers or on the ground. Throughout the month of the sample collections, the outside temperatures ranged from 6°C to 8°C, and the water temperatures ranged from 4°C to 14°C. The pH levels of all the water bodies ranged from 4 to 8, and turbidity ranged from 0 JTU to 4 JTU. This year we had warm weather for this time as November is usually the beginning of winter. The sites where samples were collected were selected because they were the main bodies of water in the area. Also, they were chosen so that students could have hands-on experience in learning about the surrounding environment and how pollution can have an impact on water resources.

All the students were glad to be able to partake in this project. They said that it was very nice to be able to go out into their village and learn about pollution and actually see what was happening with their water.

 

Russia

On the left bank of the beautiful mighty Lena River, which flows its waters across the vast territory of Sakha Republic (Russia) into the Arctic Ocean, there stands a small town of Olekminsk. People of the town are proud of the famous river as it is the fourth longest river in Russia and 10th biggest river in the world. It gives fresh water supply to the population of the region all year round. In 2008, construction of a huge oil pipe going across the territory of Olekminsk region began. School communities were worrying if this oil pipe would influence the water quality and the environment of the river. Several groups of students were organized to perform water monitoring. Severe continental climate is typical of this region: a very short summer and a long winter with extremely low temperatures that drop below minus 50 – 55 C. Students conducted their research within WWMD program and monitored the water resources in different seasons to get more results.


Now it is the third year since the schoolchildren of Olekminsk schools have started to participate in WWMD program (in 2008). At first there were two student groups and two sites monitored by the students of the Center for Creative Development and Liberal Education. The students were enthusiastic as participating in WWMD program was exciting experience. In the 2009-2010 school year, more schools of the region joined us and now (2010-2011) we have 12 sites registered throughout Olekminsk region, out-to-out distance between the sites covers over 300 km; over 120 students and 14 teachers are involved now into the activity. The students monitor different water resources of the region with the help of special tool kits generously donated by the WWMD program, including lakes, small creeks near villages flowing into the Lena River and the Lena River itself in agricultural, industrial and residential areas. The monitoring results show that water quality in the region of Olekminsk can be considered decent, keeping up favourable conditions and the environment for different animals and fish. There’s no big threat, but we understand that people should always remember that environmental health depends on their activity, and it’s everybody’s duty to take care of it!  

 

Slovakia

On November 27th, 2010, a group of nine students and three teachers from ZS MS Dostojevskeho School in Poprad went to monitor the water at the Poprad River. It flows from a little town called Svit. The day was cold and it snowed quite hard. We monitored the water in the river and found out that it was clean (turbidity 0, dissolved oxygen 8, PH 7). All the participants were happy with the results. Something strange thing we saw was three herons sitting in a field next to the river – it was the first time we saw herons here in the winter time.

 

South Africa

Franschhoek

On October 8, students from several universities in South Africa had the opportunity to participate in a trial run of the WaterBus program’s water monitoring campaign. 

The university students engaged younger students from the Bridgehouse School (Franschhoek) and Simondium Primary in monitoring the Franschhoek River and Bergriver Dam.  In addition to the 4 tests that the World Water Monitoring Day kit tests for, the students also learned how to use electric current to measure the water level.  Following their monitoring experience, the students were able to visit the Wemmershoek Wastewater Treatment Plant, where they learned about the difference between industrial wastewater and domestic waste.

The successful day was very encouraging and the WaterBus program hopes to use their experiences to develop a nationwide schools water awareness and education campaign in 2011.

 

Kommetjie

Emanti Management kicked off their World Water Monitoring Programme for 2011 at Masiphumelele Library in the informal settlement of Masipumelele (near Kommetjie) outside Cape Town, South Africa, 29th January 2011. The event was organized with the assistance of ERM, Environmental Resources Management.

The community of Masiphumelele, which means “we will succeed” in Xhosa, built the library in 2003.  Since opening its doors, the library has developed extensive volunteer programmes, strong encouragements of other communities/individuals sharing their strengths and skills with the Masiphumelele community.  One of these programmes is a tutoring programme for young scholars held every Saturday.  Emanti Management was approached to conduct a WWMD programme with the learners on one of their tutoring Saturdays, educating and making them aware of the importance of protecting our water resources.  More than 50 students, between the ages of 15-17, participated in activities on this day. Emanti started the programme by giving a brief introduction to water management and the main purpose of World Water Monitoring Day.  Thereafter, students were divided into groups and given a WWMD kit allowing them to perform basic water monitoring tests of two different water sources in the nearby surrounding area. 

Besides students getting a valuable hands-on experience in science, they also learnt the importance of protecting our water resources and that stewardship of the environment is everyone’s responsibility.

 

Limpopo Province

Sebope Primary School is located in the Sekhukhune District of Limpopo Province approximately 36 km from Burgersfort. Water is a scarce commodity in this area and with populations growing and mining expanding it is essential that quality is maintained and that the youth take the lead in monitoring.

Six learners from Sebope Primary participated in the annual World Water Monitoring Day on 19 October 2010 by testing the pH, dissolved oxygen and turbidity levels of a well near their school. They were assisted by Cathy Dzerefos WESSA/WWF Eco-Schools coordinator for Limpopo province, Ann Powell a retired science teacher and the Eco-committee coordinator TJ Magatsela. This is the second year that the well water has been tested by the school.


The well is an oasis for biodiversity as it is situated in dry thornveld and is at least 2 metres deep. The mouth of the well has a diameter of 2 metres and is protected by a knee high stone wall. A cattle trough has been erected nearby and the cows wait patiently for someone to collect water in a bucket to quench their thirst. Although eutrophication was evident with the sides of the well having a proliferation of algae, total dissolved oxygen was high and pH was only slightly on the alkaline side. Excess nutrients could be entering the groundwater as the area lacks proper sanitation facilities.

The best indicator for good quality was nature's own as frogs were swimming in the water. A clean up was held around the well as all sorts of non biodegradables had been left in the bush around the well and some had even blown into the water source. A small wetland area with four clumps of sedges were found close by and it was suggested that the children interview local people to find out if it was larger and more watery in the past or if it has always been so dry. The testing kit stayed with the school so that other learners could participate and other water bodies in the area could be tested.

For more information on Eco-Schools please go to wessa.org.za or Limpopo Eco-School on Facebook.

 

Taiwan

Taiwan citizens have responded enthusiastically to World Water Monitoring Day since 2003. It is estimated that over 19,000 people have participated in WWMD activities between 2003-2009, and each year the total number of participants have ranked high among the countries that engaged in such events. The Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) and local Environmental Protection Bureaus invited citizens around the country to continue taking part in 2010 World Water Monitoring Day this year, increasing public awareness of water issues and citizen involvement in protecting water resources.

To encourage public participation in this meaningful program, the Taiwan EPA organized a total of three events between 09/18/2010~10/18/2010. The first of the series was held along the bank of Xindian River in Taipei County on September 18, with the EPA and the Taipei County Environmental Protection Bureau present at the opening ceremony; To give this year’s World Water Monitoring Day a boost, activities included trained instructors teaching citizens and children how to use WWMD Kits to conduct basic monitoring, and a trivia game with prizes.

The event that followed was held on Shueili River in Nantou County on October 3, co-hosted by the EPA and the Nantou County Environmental Protection Bureau. Citizens and their families were invited to take part in water monitoring on the weekend. Activities included parents and more experienced people teaching children and other learners to conduct water quality monitoring using WWMD Kits. All participants engaged in the fun of preserving water quality, and the importance of water protection was instilled among the younger generation.

The third event was held along the bank of Yanshuei River in Tainan City on October 18, co-organized by the EPA and the Tainan City Environmental Protection Bureau. Teachers and students from various elementary schools, parents, water environment patrols, volunteers, government employees and their families and other citizens concerned about the local water resources all participated in water monitoring and shared their findings on various water bodies. All participants then went on a raft ride and enjoyed the scenery of Taijiang National Park in the gentle breeze. Although this concluded this year’s program, the concern for water bodies and the determination to safeguard local freshwater supplies will be passed on.

 

Thailand

On Wednesday 20th October 2010, Traidhos Three Generation Barge Program took part in World Water Monitoring Day. Two schools, consisting of 22 students and five supporting staff took part on a typical day on the barge, completing water testing on the Chao Phraya River and discovering information on its watershed.

This trip was particularly significant for the Barge Program as Tipco Food Public Company Limited kindly sponsored the trip. The trip proved extremely successful, extracting samples from two sites along the Chao Phraya River and gaining many significant results. Additionally, the participants gained new knowledge on living sustainably and how we must work together to preserve Thai waterways.

 


United Kingdom

On the 11th of December last year, five hardy cubs from 7th Epsom took part in the World Water Monitoring Day - an international initiative to raise public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. Groups of young people from over fifty countries throughout the World currently take part in the initiative.

On a freezing Saturday afternoon, the cubs went to Stamford Green and Stew Pond to take water samples and carry out some basic monitoring of water quality using a kit supplied by the organizers. The tests involved measuring the temperature, acidity (ph), cloudiness (turbidity) and concentration of dissolved oxygen. At Stew Pond, it was so cold that the cubs had to break the ice to take a sample of water. The results indicated that the quality of the water in these two water bodies is good.

To see the results from the analysis as well as all the results from the other countries, go to www.worldwatermonitoringday.org and search for “Epsom”. The activity was considered to be an excellent activity that fits in with the Scouting movement’s ethos and next year we will be encouraging more groups to carry out additional testing in other streams and ponds in the Epsom area.

 

United States

California (Mariposa)

The Upper Merced River Watershed Council (UMRWC) held its World Water Monitoring Day event in the Upper Merced River Watershed.  The headwaters for the Merced River are located in the high country of Yosemite National Park, California.  November 13, 2010 was a typical late autumn day in the Sierra Nevada with clear blue skies.  Four staff members and 15 new volunteers withstood near freezing temperatures to conduct and participate in the early morning hands-on training along the river.  Then 19 veteran volunteers arrived for the second session to review and sharpen their skills before taking the new folks with them to conduct the monitoring at the thirteen individual sites.  Due to recent rains there was plenty of water flowing, even in the ephemeral tributaries. 

Most of the volunteers are individuals from the Mariposa County community; however, some come from as far away as the Bay Area for this event!  Many have been part of the UMRWC’s Citizen Water Quality Monitoring Program since its inception in 2004.  The volunteers range widely in age and include some families, and there are two elementary school groups that regularly participate.  In addition, the UMRWC partners with Yosemite Institute which conducts water monitoring with hundreds of kids throughout the school year, this year reaching over 4,000 kids and their families.


Seven sites along the mainstem of the Merced River and six tributaries were monitored.  The sites furthest upriver are located in Yosemite Valley and then extend as far as the Central Valley.  The protocols do not require water samples to be collected.  Volunteers conduct all the tests on-site so one session takes approximately one to two hours.  Parameters include air temperature, water temperature, total dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and pH.  Sites were selected to cover a significant length of the Upper Merced River and some tributaries as well as to help identify possible point and non-point source pollution (i.e. waste water treatment facilities, development).  Much of the Upper Merced River Watershed is managed by federal agencies: National Park Service, US Forest Service, and Bureau of Land Management.  However, due to the high number of visitors to the area, increasing pressures of development, and climate change the UMRWC sees the water monitoring program as an important aspect of assessing watershed health.  It’s also a great way to increase environmental awareness and stewardship.

Although the day was long, participants seemed to enjoy the challenge of learning the scientific protocols, bonding with other volunteers, and gaining a sense of stewardship.  “It’s great to be part of such an important cause,” is how one participant summed up the day.

 

California (Willows)

In the fall of 2009, Glenn County RCD planner Claudia Street and local rancher/RCD associate director Kathy Landini came to Mrs. Egly’s fourth grade classroom at Murdock Elementary School in Willows, California,  and talked about the importance of having good, clean water as a natural resource.   The students had previously learned about how to improve water quality through a RSD demonstration at Farm Day.  The students were very excited to have their own Water Monitoring Kit.

On March 17th, Natalie Wolder and Kevin Kibby from the Bureau of Reclamation came to each of Murdock School’s fourth grade classrooms and pre-taught water measuring vocabulary and concepts.  Students learned about the equipment used to measure water depth and velocity in a creek as well as the importance of multiplication in determining the water flow.

 

On March 19th, all of Murdock’s 128 fourth grade students went to Vogt Ranches’ Three Creeks Ranch southwest of Elk Creek for a day of science learning and nature exploration.  This site was chosen because of Mr. Vogt’s generosity in spending his 2009 Leopold Conservation  monetary award to fund and cover all expenses for a science field trip for Murdock’s fourth graders.  With the help of BOR staffers Mrs. Wolder and RJ Salvagno, students were able to actually measure the depth and velocity of  Clover Creek and calculate the flow of the creek by taking a single sample for the entire group.  Using the Water Monitoring kit, they were able to measure the temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and pH of the water from Clover Creek.  At another station, students were able to explore the creek itself and capture and identify the diversity and numbers of invertebrates in the creek to get an idea of the health of the creek and its inhabitants on this beautiful, clear spring day.

Staff and students plan to use the Water Monitoring kit again on May 6th  at the Landini Family’s Divide Ranch in Fruto and on May 12th  at the Mudd Ranch in Clark’s Valley. 

The most striking and amazing thing noticed was the color of the “clear” water when  doing the different turbidity and DO tests.  It  really opened the students’ “eyes” to degrees of visual and mental perception.

 

Colorado

On September 22, 2010, engineers and scientists from CH2M HILL, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Colorado Department of Public Health hosted 100 fifth grade students from Trevista Elementary School in Denver and Fletcher Intermediate School in Aurora for Denver’s third annual World Water Monitoring Day event in Confluence Park along the South Platte River. In addition, students from the Denver School of Science & Technology served as mentors for the younger students.

Participants learned firsthand about water quality by testing the South Platte River using World Water Monitoring Day kits. In addition, EPA displayed monitoring equipment, and a mobile laboratory provided the students with hands-on opportunities to learn about nonpoint source pollution, microbiology and macroinvertebrates. The non-profit organization Water For People also hosted a water relay to help the students understand the responsibilities and hardships of children in developing countries who must work to provide water for their families. WFP shared stories of how poor water quality impacts human health, and how the organization is making a difference in the developing world by providing safe, clean drinking water and sanitation.

Before the monitoring event, volunteers from CH2M HILL and EPA visited the schools to explain the monitoring process. Volunteers returned to classrooms after the event to engage students in follow-up discussions on the results and implications of their findings and to assist them in entering results into the WWMD database. The global focus of the program was brought home through virtual partnering events with schools in Costa Rica and Macedonia. Each school developed a videotape of their experiences, prepared poems or songs about the event, and shared them with one another.

Over all, the event helped to promote environmental stewardship by teaching students about their local water resources and empowering them to take ownership in protecting our environment. Everyone had a great time, learned some fun new facts to share with friends and family, and a few students even professed their own desire to become scientists, engineers, and mathematicians!

 

Florida

Eighty-nine fourth grade science students on the Ft. Lauderdale campus of Pine Crest School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida are leading the efforts to protect their local environment.  These inquisitive and involved students have a better understanding of the interdependence of important natural resources in a larger, global setting through their participation in World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD). WWMD presents an important opportunity for young people to become involved in safeguarding natural resources on a local, national and international scale. Joining students around the world from Argentina to Zimbabwe, they paid their local waterways a visit in order to test four basic indicators of water quality. Students tested their school’s pond and canal for dissolved oxygen, pH (acidity), temperature and turbidity (clarity), important indicators of the water’s quality. The resulting data was recorded onto an international database where students and teachers use their findings and compare their data with others around the world.

While engaged in this event, the students learned more about watersheds, how watersheds work and how protecting our water can have beneficial impacts downstream.  Students reflecting on the experience stated, “I felt like a real scientist…it was fun taking water samples, measuring temperatures of the air and water and testing the samples.” 

 

Georgia (Atlanta)

Fifteen students from First Montessori School of Atlanta, ages 6-12, participated in World Water Monitoring Day activities Sept. 15 at The John Ripley Forbes Big Trees Preserve in the City of Sandy Springs. Two FMSA Middle School students observed the process. They will perform the tests in the Long Island Watershed, which is part of the school campus. WWMD is an international education and outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting the world's water resources. More than 120,000 people in 81 countries monitored their local waterways in 2009.

According to Sandy Springs' Stormwater Utility Manager David Chastant, P.E., the student volunteers performed tests for dissolved oxygen, pH, clarity and temperature. The tests indicate how healthy the water is for the animals that live in it. By comparing this year's results with those from last year, students learn the important role water plays in creating a good environment for all living creatures.

"We want our students to understand the complex relationship between people and the earth," says First Montessori School of Atlanta Head of School Jerri King. "By participating in projects like this, they develop an awareness of the natural world and their responsibility for it."

Additional information on First Montessori School of Atlanta, the Southeast's oldest Montessori school, is available at www.firstmontessori.org.

 

Georgia (Hampton)

Girl Scout Troop 358 participated in their second annual World Water Monitoring Day on National Public Lands Day September 25th.  The seven Junior Girl Scouts started the day in Hampton, GA at North Mount Carmel Park (which they had adopted in 2009 with fellow cub and boy scouts chartered from Mount Carmel United Methodist Church).  Henry County Parks and Recreation Department organized and funded their National Public Lands Day in which they weeded and then planted rose bushes in an existing container garden.  They worked in groups to further their commitment to Leave No Trace by choosing programs in which to teach their fellow Girl Scout members.

The day ended in Griffin, GA at Camp Cecil Jackson to participate in their second annual WWMD.  The Girl Scout camp was chosen by the girls as it is a local camp and where they spent one of their first troop overnight camping experiences.  The girls took two samples from the pond and averaged their results while learning about the tests they were performing and their impact on their community water.  They compared their results from 2009 and discussed the differences, including the different times of the year in which they monitored and the effect that had on their measurements.  The pond was stirring with fish and the bank with crickets, indicative of a healthy pond in itself.

It was an exceptionally nice day and a very special way to celebrate their girl scout leader’s birthday of September 25th, who is passionate about conservation and passing it down to the future generations.

 

Massachusetts

Hi! My name is Emeline Antunes, a sixth grader in Mrs. Wenham’s class at the McGlynn Middle School in Medford, Massachusetts. By participating in the WWMD I was able to learn a lot about the Mystic River. When I tested the Mystic River with 140 other 6th grade students I made a hypothesis saying that the Mystic River would be healthy. Next, I tested the turbidity using a Secchi disk. After that we tested the water temperature and the air temperature. When I was done with those tests, I tested the DO and the pH. I followed all the instructions for each test.

These were my results of the testing of the Mystic River. When I tested the turbidity I got O JTU’s, and that ranks as excellent on the scale. For the pH I got the number 7, which had a ranking of excellent. The results of the DO gave the river a ranking of good, 6 ppm. So my hypothesis was correct – the Mystic River is healthy, but we can’t drink it.

I would like to thank Mrs. Tabacsko from the MWRA. She was a great helper and she was able to answer all our questions. By the way, did you know that she won an international award from the WWMD and I think she deserved it? So again, thank you Mrs. Tabacsko for helping us out.

Missouri

The 2nd annual Little Creek Nature Area Watershed Festival was pleased to take part in a 2010 World Water Monitoring Day sponsored event in the St. Louis Area.    The Little Creek Nature Area, in collaboration with several organizations, hosted a one day community event on September 25, 2010 to raise community awareness about water quality and watershed protection. 
 

Located in North St. Louis County, the Little Creek Nature Area is a 97-acre outdoor educational facility owned and operated by the Ferguson-Florissant School District.  Since 1974, teachers have provided ecology, environmental science, field biology and living history programs for district students.  The nature area includes Little Creek, a stream tributary in the Maline Creek Watershed. Due to years of surrounding area urbanization, Little Creek is impacted by nonpoint source pollution and erosion.   In 2007, the Little Creek Nature Area, along with various partners started the Little Creek Watershed Restoration and Education Project to restore Little Creek to a more natural, clean environment and host community outreach events.  

A highlight of the watershed festival was student-led tours to “Discovery Pond” located within the Little Creek watershed, where elementary, middle, and high school students performed  water quality testing at designated locations using the World Water Monitoring Day test kits. The test kits were donated by the MWEA Watershed Management Committee.

 

Ohio

On Wednesday, September 29, 2010, over three-hundred students from Theodore Roosevelt High School's Advanced Chemistry, Environmental Science, and CP Physical Science classes got out of the classroom and went down to Breakneck Creek in Kent to perform a variety of scientific measurements. 

Physical Science students used tape measures and meter sticks to plot out the cross-sectional contour of the creek at
five sites, while Environmental Science and Advanced Chemistry students worked together to take a variety of water quality measurements to determine the creek’s Water Quality Index (WQI).  Students used everything from high-tech Vernier LabQuests and electronic sensors to water testing kits to low-tech oranges and nets to collect data! 
 

The students then brought the data back to their classes to map out the creek’s cross-section, aggregate their water quality data, and determine the flow rate of the creek.  They found that the average WQI was 76.3, which indicated a "good" water quality.  As the year goes on, we hope to collect all of this data into a stream study about Breakneck Creek that we can pass on to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

 

South Dakota

Sioux Falls is the largest city in the U.S. state of South Dakota. The Census of 2009 indicated the population of the city was 157,935. The Big Sioux River is a tributary of the Missouri River and it flows through Sioux Falls and passes over a waterfall, which gives the city its name.

Sherry Chen and her family members monitored the Big Sioux River at Sertoma Park and Tuthhill Park on October 11 and 19, 2010, respectively.


On October 11 at 5:00 pm, the detected air temperature was 22 ºC and water temperature was 18 ºC. Turbidity was 40 JTU and dissolved oxygen was 8ppm. pH value was 7. On October 19, the measurement results were similar except that the weather was colder. The air temperature was 20 ºC and the water temperature was 12 ºC at 4:45pm.

The Big Sioux River water quality is good, and the Chens could observe some fish in the river. The Falls Park is a favorite fishing place for citizens and visitors.

In this monitoring activity, the water monitoring kit was provided by the South Dakota Discovery Center and the 319 Information and Education Project. This is the first time that the Big Sioux River was monitored in the Sioux Falls area under the World Water Monitoring Day program. The Chen family plans to continue the water monitoring in the future and provide data for the program.

 

Texas

Houston

When Joseph Robinette, a 10 year old student at Armand Bayou Elementary School in Houston Texas, was trying to decide on a Science Fair project, he told his mom that he wanted to do a project on water. Because he lives on the gulf coast of the United States, he had become very concerned about the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. He also lives very near a beautiful lake called Clear Lake which flows into Galveston Bay and then into the Gulf of Mexico. With his mother's help, he found World Water Monitoring Day on the computer and joined right away.

Joseph has begun his water testing in 9 sites that encompass all of Clear Lare.  Clear Lake has many streams that flow into it.  And some of these streams flow through the many chemical plants that dot the Houston area.

He will be reporting his findings in the next few weeks.  His plan for the future is to continue testing and monitoring Clear Lake and also testing and monitoring a number of the lakes tributaries.

His teachers are very excited about Joseph’s project and are interested in becoming a part of World Water Monitoring Day next year. Joseph will certainly be a part of this great effort next year.

 

San Antonio

On November 30, 2010, CH2M HILL, a local full-service engineering, construction, and operations firm, is increasing awareness of water quality issues through its support of World Water Monitoring Day. 

During September and October, CH2M HILL volunteer water monitors shared their expertise with fifth graders and brought them samples from local creeks, which they jointly analyzed for water quality characteristics. This year, about 650 students from Beacon Hill, Coronado Village, DeZavala, Northwest Crossing, Passmore, and Wanke elementary schools participated in monitoring water quality parameters. Riverine samples were collected from San Antonio water bodies including Woodlawn Lake, Espada Dam on the San Antonio River, Leon Creek,  Alazan Creek, Huebner Creek, and Salado Creek.  Resulting data are used to determine a basic health screening for the associated watersheds and compared to areas all over the world.  Various local agencies participated in the water day, including the San Antonio Water System (SAWS), the San Antonio River Authority (SARA), the Edwards Aquifer Authority (EAA), and members of the Girl Scouts to educate students about water issues that affect our city. 

CH2M HILL has served South Texas clients since 1985, and has 64 employees in San Antonio. World Water Monitoring Day™, coordinated by the Water Environment Federation, is an international education and outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources by engaging citizens to conduct basic monitoring of local water bodies. Participants are asked to conduct testing on four basic characteristics of water quality, including pH, temperature, turbidity and dissolved oxygen. Participation continues to grow toward the organization’s goal of one million volunteers by the year 2012.

 

Virginia

On Saturday, March 20, 2010, Girl Scout Troops # 544, #124 and #4444 of Virginia Skyline Council participated in Lynchburg Parks & Recreation Department sponsored “March Makeover” event, held at Peaks View Park in Lynchburg, VA. Lynchburg Parks & Recreation’s Naturalist Kathie Driscoll and Robert E. Lee Soil and Water Agent, Garrett Jones facilitated the event as part of World Water Monitoring Day.


Peaks View Park is the second largest park in Lynchburg, with seven multi-purpose fields, tennis courts, basketball courts, playgrounds, picnic shelters and trails. It is very popular among many city residents, including, athletes, active individuals, small children and nature lovers. The pond located in the park acts as a retention pond built to capture runoff and pollutants. In spite of its intended function and Peaks View Park’s multi-usage, the pond has flourished into a habitat teeming with a variety of wildlife.

Twenty-six Girl Scouts, scout leaders and city employees spent the day cleaning up the pond. The event took place at 10:00 a.m. with clear skies and temperatures of 24.4°C (76°F), providing the perfect weather to partake in an outdoor event. The participants took water samples from Peaks View Park pond; testing turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and pH. The water temperature was recorded as 10.8°C (51.44°F), turbidity at 40 JTU and a pH of 7.00. The most abundant types of benthic macroinvertebrates observed by the girls were dragonflies and scuds. The scouts observed many tadpoles, several various frog species, and  noted a few turtles.

The Girl Scouts picked up trash in and around the pond to contribute to a healthier habitat for the wildlife. The overall day was a success and everyone had fun being outside and contributing to the World Water Monitoring Day event.

 

Vietnam

Hanoi #1

On September 19th 2010, 300 volunteers from four youth environmental groups including Go Green ( http://www.gogreen.com.vn), 3R ( http://3r-hn.vn), VFEC- Hanoi Natural Resources and Environmental College, ACC – Hanoi National University of Education and other high schools & colleges participated in the WWMD large event in Hanoi. Two weeks before the monitoring day, the phenomenon “World Water Monitoring Day” was put on the headlines of websites, forums and on Facebook of these environmental clubs. This is the first time these groups cooperate to carry out a meaning event for “environment lover” community.

The 300 volunteers were divided into four groups monitoring the water quality of four important lakes in Hanoi: West Lake, Thanh Cong Lake, Ngoc Khanh Lake and Giang Vo Lake.

Volunteers were very excited to have the opportunity to perform tests for dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity and temperature by themselves. Whatever their actual profession, they all were environmentalists on Sunday, September 19th 2010 and very proud to be a part of WWMD 2010.

Following are the average results of the water quality index that the groups examined:

 

Lake

DO
( ppm)

pH

Temperature
(oC)

Turbidity
( JTU)

Ngoc Khanh

7

8

29

50

Thanh Cong

6.5

8

29

40

Giang Vo

6

7.5

28

45

West Lake

6.5

9

29

40

 

Volunteers also recognized their responsibilities to extend the WWMD activity by calling upon the participation of the youth and to make it be more of a community event, which would educate people about the importance of environmental protection of their water resources. Members of Go Green, 3R, VFEC and ACC clubs and other participants are ready to contribute to a larger WWMD event for the next year 2011.

Hanoi #2

Six lower-secondary schools made history in January and May 2010 by being the first in Vietnam to conduct World Water Monitoring Day across an entire river basin. Nhue-Day River Basin.

The Department of Water Resources Management trained 25 teachers and more than 500 students to sample and test water quality and report their findings. A total of 14 water bodies were monitored including rivers, lakes and ponds. The sites were selected to represent the wide variety of waterways across the Nhue-Day River Basin.

The Nhue-Day River Basin is located in northern Vietnam and includes the capital of Vietnam, Hanoi. The catchment covers 7,500 square kilometers of land (2% of Vietnam’s total landmass) and has a population of over 10 million people. The Nhue-Day River Basin drains into the Gulf of Tonkin. The river basin contains dense urban centres, industrial zones and intensive agricultural areas.

While engaged in the monitoring event, students learned how the river basin works and how protecting water quality can have beneficial impacts. Teachers and students used their data to discuss impacts in their local waterways and compared their findings with other sampling points.

Six schools were selected to represent the upper (Ha Noi and Hoa Binh), middle (Ha Nam) and lower (Ninh Binh, Nam Dinh) components of the Nhue-Day River Basin.

Posters were created by the students and shared with international partner schools located in the Hunter-Central River Catchment Management Authority in Australia. The students in Australia and Vietnam shared information, pictures and photos about their local water resources and water quality. The poster-exchange allowed students to develop an appreciation of the global issues that impact water resources management.

 

Hanoi #3

On September 19, 2010, 300 volunteers from four youth environmental groups including Go Green, 3R, VFEC- Hanoi Natural Resources and Environmental College, ACC – Hanoi National University of Education and from other high schools & colleges participated in a large WWMD event in Hanoi. During two weeks before the monitoring day, the phenomenon “World Water Monitoring Day” was put on the headlines of websites, forums and facebooks of these environmental clubs. This is the first time these groups cooperated to carry out a meaningful event for the local community of “environment lovers.”
 

The 300 volunteers were divided into four groups monitoring the water quality of four important Lakes in Hanoi (West Lake, Thanh Cong Lake, Ngoc Khanh Lake and Giang Vo Lake).

Participating in WWMD, volunteers were very excited to have the opportunity to perform tests for dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity and temperature by themselves. Whoever they are, they all were environmentalists on Sunday September 19, 2010 and very proud of being part of WWMD 2010.

Following are the average results of water quality index that the groups examined:

 

Lake

DO
( ppm)

pH

Temperature
(oC)

Turbidity
( JTU)

Ngoc Khanh

7

8

29

50

Thanh Cong

6.5

8

29

40

Giang Vo

6

7.5

28

45

West Lake

6.5

9

29

40

 

Volunteers also recognized their reponsibilities to extend the WWMD acitivity by calling upon the participation of the youth and to turn it into more of a community event which would educate people about the importance of environmental protection of their water resources. Members of Go Green, 3R, VFEC and ACC clubs and other participants are ready to contribute to a larger WWMD event for the next year 2011.

 

Zimbabwe

Fact finding visits were made to the Nyagui and Upper Mazowe Subcatchments on the Youth Action for Improved Water Quality in Zimbabwe Project which was launched by the Minister in October 2009.  During the four day tour, twenty nine schools that were involved in the programme were visited.  Interviews of the Mashonaland Central Provincial Education Director’s Office and Mashonaland East Provincial Directors were also conducted. 
 

 

WWMC rocks!
Posted by arika.lawrence@gmail.com on 2/6/2012
Title *  
Comment *  
Display Name *