On Location

2009 Participant Stories

12/1/2009
Submitted by 2009 Participant Stories

  • Armenia  
  • Bulgaria  
  • Croatia  
  • Comoros  
  • Costa Rica  
  • Cuba  
  • Georgia  
  • India  
  • Indonesia  
  • Iran  
  • Madagascar  
  • Nigeria  
  • Pakistan 
  • Poland 
  • Romania 
  • Spain 
  • United Arab Emirates 
  • United States 
  • Vietnam 
  •  

    Armenia

    With the financial assistance of the Global Water Partnership of Central Asia and Caucasus and technical assistance from the WWMD program, Country Water Partnership NGO in Armenia implemented water monitoring activities in the Debed River catchment basin on October 17. The purpose was to attract the basin population's attention to local water resource problems, to involve them in the water resources protection process, and to train them in the simplest methods of measuring water quality's main indicators.

    The monitoring was implemented in the Lori region, upstream to the Debed basin, in the towns of Spitak (river Chichkhan and tributary Pambijur), Stepanavan (river Dzoraget and tributary Agarak), Vanadzor (river Pambak and tributaries Tandzut and Vanadzor), as well as at the Debed river's source where the Dzoraget and Pambak rivers join together, forming river Debed.

    This basin is of transboundary importance, since it forms the transboundary river Debed within Armenia, which flows to Georgia and joins with the Kura river, which later flows into the Caspian Sea.

    More than 100 participants from local self-governing bodies, mass media, NGOs, schools and higher education institutions, Vanadzor and Stepanavan Environmental Information Centers (Aarhus Centers) and other organizations from five residential areas of Armenia took part in the monitoring.

    On October 17, from 11:00 to 12:30, 25 water samples were taken at 15 points along the basin's rivers where the main water quality indicators (temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, pH) were determined by using WWMD-provided monitoring kits.


    Weather was clear and without clouds in Lori region on October 17. The results of observations showed that air temperature varied in a range of 14°C - 22°C, and water temperature -6°C - 120°C; turbidity indicator 0 was recorded at three points, and a measurement of 100 was determined at the river Debed. At other points, turbidity indicator was 40. Oxygen concentration at all points varied in a range of 4 - 8 ppm, and pH within a range of 7-8, except in a Vanadzor area called “Ttu Jur”, where pH was 5. This reading was natural, since the name of the site is translated as “acid water”.

    A number of active young people were awarded certificates. The activity was shot in Stepanavan and Vanadzor and broadcasted by local TV programs and first public TV program of Armenia. 

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    Bulgaria

    Bourgas

    On February 18, 2009 twenty-five 2nd, 3rd, and 4th graders from Michail Lakatnick Primary School in Bourgas, Bulgaria participated in water monitoring as part of their weekly eco-club. Bourgas is an area blessed with access to many diverse bodies of water. The surrounding area comprises the largest wetlands complex in Bulgaria and consists of three lakes and the Black Sea.

    The kids tested freshwater samples from Lake Mandra, brackish water from the nature conservation center PODA, and salt water from the Black Sea.  The testing began with a discussion about how much water exists in the world, what is accessible to us, and why it is important to conserve and protect our water. Using the monitoring kit from the Global Water Network the students took turns testing turbidity, pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature.

    In addition to water samples, sediment samples were also taken to show the students the difference in habitats. Their surprising conclusion – Water that appears dirty can actually be quite healthy and contain a variety of macro-invertebrates and plant life necessary for the survival of other animals.

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    Yambol

    On a cloudy autumn day in Bulgaria, twenty 12th grade students from Yambol’s Vasil Karagozev Language School took time away from their English lessons to test the water in a local river. Their test body of water, the Tundja (Тунджа) River, travels south from central Bulgaria through Yambol before crossing the border into Turkey. River Tundja has been the subject of much testing and monitoring in the past decade due to high levels of pollution.

    Using a WWMD-donated water testing kit, the students split into four groups to analyze temperature, turbidity, pH, and dissolved oxygen levels. Local fisherman, out for an early morning catch, looked on in amazement as two young women heading the “Temperature” and “Turbidity” groups climbed down the riverbank to take their samples.

    Final results for the Tundja River were positive, and these young Bulgarians were proud to know that their work would be used as part of a global effort for environmental awareness.

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    Comoros

    2009 heralded the second year of World Water Monitoring Day in the Comoros with groups of young environmentalists carrying out water quality tests and awareness raising events around the island. The campaign was organized by Community Centred Conservation (C3), a British NGO that has been operating in the archipelago since 2005. They collaborated with a group known as the Junior Ecoguards – a group of young local environmentalists that C3 established in 2006.

    In order to expand on last year’s experience, the Junior Ecoguards underwent a refresher course on the importance of good water quality and the various variables recorded to test for it. They were then introduced to Microsoft Excel and shown how they can take a quick look at the differences in villages’ water quality through graphs and charts. Armed with this broader understanding, the Junior Ecoguards, supported by C3, descended on various study sites around the Comoros. At three sites: Itsandra, Moroni and Iconi, coastal waters and domestic cisterns were targeted while the group took the opportunity to explain the project to over 100 interested onlookers at each site.

    Water quality is often the primary risk to health in developing countries. In the Comoros infrastructure is poor and running water a rarity leading to a reliance on private and public cisterns. With large scale rubbish dumping common these cisterns are under threat from leaching chemicals and abandoned refuse. To help raise awareness Junior Ecoguards shall be visiting the village association in one of the sample villages during 2010. They will use their new skills in Microsoft Excel and Powerpoint to develop a presentation on World Water Monitoring Day and why it is we should all be so concerned with the quality of our water.

    As the skills of the Junior Ecoguards grow so does their capacity to impact on local environmental and health issues, we look forward to next year for a chance to see what they have come up with by then.

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    Costa Rica

    Mr. José Brenes has kindly shared his reports of ongoing water quality monitoring in and around Costa Rica's Central Valley. The first three documents (in Spanish) have been provided by Mr. Brenes whereas the third was submitted on behalf of students from the Escuela Monseñor Anselmo Llorente. Please click the below links to view the group's reports.

     

    Inspeccion 2: Analisis y Diagnostico de la Cuenca del Rio los Ahogados 

    Inspeccion 3: Analisis y Diagnostico de la Cuenca del Rio los Ahogados 

    Inspeccion 4: Analisis Y Diagnostico de la Cuenca del Rio los Ahogados 

    Reporte del monitoreo realizado en la Quebrada Rivera 

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    San José

    CH2M HILL's Denver office teamed with the Lincoln School in San José Costa Rica to hold WWMD events on the same day. The students made videos of their respective events to share with one another. Click here to view the video from the Lincoln School.

    Croatia

    Pupils from  primary school Antuna Mihanovica, Osijek did hydrological measurements in the spring and fall of 2009 on three sites: two lakes (ponds), which were made by anthropological action (now used for recreation and fishing) and one on river Drava in Osijek (navigable from the Danube to Osijek). There were 12 students participants (from 5th to 8th grade) and their leader. They used the protocols from the World Water Monitoring Day program.
     

    Surveys at three sites included measurements of temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen content, turbidity (using turbidity tubes), and conductivity (different amount of dissolved minerals). The students assumed that the results from the samples of stagnant water would differ from those of the samples that had been collected from flowing water.

    Results of hydrological measurements:

     


    Site
     

    Date 

    Time 

    Turbidity 

    Air Temp. 

    Water
    Temp.
     

    DO 

    pH 

    Conductivity 

    1.Bajer Jug 2

    22.4.

    9:13

    40

    14

    17

    4

    7.5

    728

    2.Bajer Nasicki

    22.4

    10:10

    60

    12

    17.5

    8

    8

    1177

    3.River Drava

    22.4

    10:50

    70

    12

    14

    4

    7

    292

    1.Bajer Jug 2

    16.9.

    9:20

    40

    21

    23

    8

    8

    830

    2.Bajer Nasicki

    16.9.

    10:00

    40

    22

    23

    4

    8.5

    1226

    3.River Drava

    16.9.

    10:30

    40

    23

    19

    4

    8

    312

     

    The students concluded that the conductivity of the pond water was higher because it contained more dissolved minerals. The minerals may have washed into the water from the surrounding fields, or they could have been the result of pollution.

    The students also projected that the amount of oxygen was greater at the second site in July because of the strong wind and waves. The first site contained a great amount of green algae.

    Most of the water samples had basic reactions. The students decided that in order to come to a conclusion about the quality of the water and to find the differences between the stagnant and the flowing water, a greater number of measurements is required. In the future, they will try to expand these measurements. The students indicated that the monitoring activity was a pleasant experience, which allowed them to explore nature and to contribute to the preservation of water resources.

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    Cuba

    On July 7th the Cuba GSA (Global Sports Alliance) team monitored the La Cotorra Dam, and a smaller dam belonging to the José Marti Cooperative in the province Pinar del Río, Cuba, a beautiful northern province.  The La Cotorra Dam provides water to 1820 consumers for domestic purposes with the exception of drinking.  The small dam belonging to the cooperative provides water for the irrigation of crops such as tobacco and corn.

    On the same day, they also monitored the Los Palacios River.  This is very close to an urban location that swimmers, primarily young children and teens, frequently visit.  The river is known as “El Paso de las Mujeres,” or in English, The Passage of the Women, but not because women are the only ones who go.  All who desire a refreshing bath amid the hot summer visit this place!  This site saw a lot of damage from the hurricanes that affected it, as evidenced by fallen trees and ground erosion. 

    Below are the results from each sampling:

     

     

    Turbidity 

    H2O Temp 

    DO 

    pH 

    La Cotorra Dam

    0 JTU

    30°C

    4 ppm

    8

    José Marti Dam

    100 JTU

    27°C

    0 ppm

    7

    Los Palacios River

    0 JTU

    28°C

    3 ppm

    7

     

    The GSA provides educational programs about the importance of water for society, including its exhaustion and contamination, and the removal of objects, branches, wood, or sweepings spilled in the area.  They also provide recreational activities to contribute to the environmental education in the community in order to better the quality of life and the preservation of the ecosystem.

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    Georgia

    On november 26, the students from the primary school Mertskhali in Tbilisi had their water monitoring day at the lake Kus Tba ("the lake of turtles"). The lake is on one of the mountains surrounding the city. It's a recreation area where people swim in summer and the pupils decided to sample the water here. It was a saline which was desalinated artificially.

    Six students of  6th grade and a teacher used the  kit donated by WWMD program. It was  the first time  that they took the part in World Water Monitoring Day activities. It was 11:30 when they came to the lakeside.  It was a cold and cloudy morning. The temperature of the air and water was the same 6°C, but after testing the sun came out of the clouds and it became warmer. The turbidity of the water was 40 JTU, DO level 8 ppm, pH 9.

    The students were very happy and they are going to monitor the same site and some other water bodies in the spring.

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    India

    Western Uttar Pradesh with the National Capital Territory has been blessed to be located in the doab of the holy River Ganga and River Yamuna. This region famous as one of the most fertile regions over the Globe has always been lased with immense natural resources and a green cover all over. The region has over half a dozen rivers flowing through it and is sanctified with over a lakh small and big water sources. But the recent past has seen these sources extensively being polluted.

    NEER Foundation, Meerut in associating itself with the marking of the World Water Monitoring Day organised the water monitoring events in various cities of the region namely Meerut, Gaziabad, Bulandshehar, Muzaffarnagar, Baghpat, Etah, Aligarh, Agra and the National Capital Delhi. The Foundation was provided with eight water test kits by the WWMD program.

    The program was launched at various levels and extensive monitoring had taken place over the extended window which initiated in June and ended in November 2009. It was done in association with various schools involving over 700 school children. It was also done at a different level involving various non governmental organisations indulging over 200 activists towards this noble cause. The students and activists were chosen in a way so as to touch upon not only the upper class but the important stakeholders of the society in the forms of minorities and dalits. A huge percentage of people involved were from a rural background.

    The major water sources covered during this long campaign included Rivers Ganga, Yamuna, Kali, Krishni, Hindon, Dhamela etc. It also included Ganga Canal, Sanjay Gandhi Lake, the Historical Gandhari Lake, Nawaldeh Well, Hand-pumps, Submersible Pumps, Severs and various other fresh water sources. These sources were chosen as these are the ones which the residents relate to for different activities like water for domestic use, irrigation etc.

    The results were deeply saddening and pitiful indicating towards the water sources going dead. The chemicals flowing with the water course is demeaning the water quality to the depressing levels. The hazards like water borne diseases which are increasing were clearly connected to the results. This was well tested in over 400 samples from 112 different sources.

    The schools associated with the program are Shri Dayaleshwar Public School, Meerut; K V Public School, Parikshitgarh; Mahakavi Saraswati Sishu Mandir, Hapur; DAV Public School, Budhana; Bal Bhawan Public School, Delhi, Bharti Public School, Delhi and Ryan International, Delhi.

    In addition to this, the various organisations who actively participated in the program and without whom this program could not have reached such a large strata of society are worth a mention herein as Jan Kalyan Sansthan, Meerut, Nature Foundation (India), Delhi; Research and Relief Society, Meerut; Samiksha, Gaziabad; and Parivartan, Ghazaiabad.

    The children who got involved with the program were pretty excited to conduct these programs themselves and looking at the results, they were highly sensitised towards the present condition of water sources and took an oath to save water in every way possible at their levels.

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    Indonesia

    Water is an essential component for all living beings on this earth. Water not only serves as a habitat, but is also also very important for the body as a regulator of temperature, transporter of nutrients, facilitator of chemical reactions, and building block of tissue components.

    State Junior High School 2 Pancur Batu (SMP 2) always supports the efforts of the Indonesian government organizations and even the world to maintain and preserve the environment. On 21 September SMP 2 Pancur Batu was awarded the ENO Tree Planting Day certificate. For that effort to be successful, water quality is an absolute. Thus, WWMD activities including the measurement of dissolved oxygen (DO), acidity (pH), turbidity, and temperature are important.

    Participating in the WWMD activities were 17 people (3 teachers, 14 students) chaired by Lisda Raida Manurung. Monitoring took place on 2-5 December 2009 by taking five samples of each river. Two river samples (Asahan River and River Babura) were taken in Medan where there are many people and a factory. Another sample was taken in Deli Serdang (Belawan River, Tengah River, Sembahe River). Around this location there is no factory/industry and local residents use the river water for everyday activities such as washing, bathing, and even the baths used for tourists. The monitoring weather was sunny weather and cloudless.

    Students are very enthusiastic to follow these activities because they can immediately test the water quality and it instills in them a sense of awareness in the importance of the responsibility of preserving the environment. On the last day of monitoring all the participants enjoyed the freshness of the water in the bath Sembahe River.

    Results were as follows:

     

     

    Turbidity 

    H2O Temp 

    DO 

    pH 

    Asahan River

    100

    28

    4

    8

    Babura River

    100

    28

    4

    8

    Belawan River

    40

    28

    8

    7.5

    Tengah

    40

    28

    8

    8

    Sembahe

    0

    26

    4

    7

     

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    Iran

    Eastern Azerbaijan

    On December 25, Farid Mehri and his father first visited Kandowan, a popular town in Eastern Azerbaijan of Iran.  Farid and his father arrived at about 11:00 am. Farid notes, “There is a river with name of Kandowan Chaei.  Also there is a pipe that pumps the water from Kandowan spring that has mineral water. I tested both of them. After that, we went hiking in Sahand mountain! I knew that there is a lake on top of the mountain. I tested the water. After that, we went to Basmenj city. There is a river. I tested it, too.”  Click here to read Farid’s findings and observations for these and additional sites.

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    Tehran

    Students from Rah E Roshd Junior High School, recently learned about WWMD. Nine students were chosen by the principal to participate. Students chose to monitor the following sites: Darake River, Karaj Lake (at the dam), and Darband River. Darband and Darake are recreational centers and Karaj’s dam is one of the most important water reservoirs of Tehran city.

    Students started sampling on December 14 and 15 at the mentioned locations. After sampling, observations were noted. At both of the rivers, students saw no kinds of extra pollutants. Karaj’s dam is a restricted area so the water was clean and with no kind of serious pollution; however, because of the mountain rivers and the small amount of pollution that they carry, the lowest part of the river was a little polluted.

    By sampling these local waters students came to the conclusion that the water resources and the ingredients that they include, are one of the most important elements of our daily lives and that we must make an effort to protect them from any kind of damage and pollution. Click here to read the group's full report.

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    Madagascar

    Prior to going into the field, a Powerpoint presentation in Malagasy was prepared. The presentation was aimed at school children (between 6 and 15 years old) and centred around water and its importance. It also covered the ways in which we can test the quality of water, and ended with a demonstration of using the water testing kits.

    In the villages of Ramena and Ampasindava a group of around 20-40 children (ranging from 13-15 years old) and local schoolteachers attended the workshops. The presentations were conducted by Ismael Leandre, C3 Programme Officer and lasted around 40 minutes. Volunteers from the class participated in demonstrations for each experiment. Questions were asked of the students throughout the presentation to keep them interested and to check they understood the concepts being explained.

    Following the presentation, the students used the testing kits to test various water samples around the village. The class was separated into 5 groups (6 or 7 children in each) so that there was one testing kit per group. The students were given freedom to decide what water samples to test. A variety of water sources were sampled, including sea water (at varying distances from the shore), rivers, swimming pools and wells. Some groups were also educated about beach clean-ups, and spent some time collecting rubbish on the beach.

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    Nigeria

    Lagos

    On July 8th, the students at Western College were given the opportunity to learn about the delicate Lagos Lagoon surrounding them.  They were visited by representatives from the department of geography, University of Lagos (UNILAG), who collected samples from the lagoon and brought them to the school. The students completed the WWMD word scrabble and puzzle from the website so that they had some background information before testing the water samples.  Thanks to WWMD kit donations, all of the students were given a chance to test the water samples for themselves.  The average turbidity of the samples was 40 JTU and the pH ranged from 7.00 to 8.00.

    The students were so excited by their findings that they began to discuss the creation of an environmental awareness club in the school.  It was a very successful event in spreading awareness about water quality for both the students and several families living in the lagoon who assisted with the collection of samples.

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    Lagos

    WWMD activities commenced for the students of Botsun Private School in Lagos, Nigeria with a pre-monitoring lecture in the School compound. A lecture titled: Healthy Water, Healthy People was presented by Lasisi K.S.A and Titilope Akosa who also spoke about the Millennium Development Goal pertaining to water and sanitation.  

    The actual water monitoring was carried out at Ajegunle Community along Lagos-Abeokuta Express way in Lagos State. The water body that was monitored was the Ilo-Awela stream (one of the streams running into the Ogun River, a major river in South West Nigeria.) The monitoring was done on the 3rd of September, 2009, with 45 students and some teachers and parents in attendance. Two water samples were collected at about 500 meters apart along the water course.

    The general environment of the stream was good with the natural environment undisturbed. However, some human activities like washing and swimming can be noticed along the stream. The site was selected for its proximity to the school.

    After the program, most of the students, parents and teachers expressed their gratitude to the organizer as these opportunities are usually not available to children from schools in rural communities. Click here to view their report.

    Click below to see Lasisi's reports from subsequent water monitoring activities:

    Lagos Lagoon (Adeniji) 

    Majidun River 

    Lagos Lagoon 1 

    Lagos Lagoon 2 

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    Pakistan

    April 22, 2009 — Communities around the world are observing Earth Day. It is a time to focus our attention upon a situation where we are facing a shortage of safe drinking water. If we increase global understanding about the need to manage water resource in an integrated manner, then we will be able to make this universe beautiful and peaceful for others. Our Earth may be 70% water, but only 1% of this resource is available for use by a global population of 6.77 billion. It’s our responsibility to keep it clean and to educate others about water quality by monitoring our local waterways and by sharing our experiences with the global community. Awareness and understand-ing are the first steps toward Action.

    Keeping in view the importance of the day, Mr. Rangeen Khan along with students of 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 8th classes monitored their local water source in Swabi, Pakistan and water samples were taken using the kit provided by the WWMD program. Results were as follows:

     

    Site   

    Results  

    Date

    22/04/2009

    Place

    Hafiz Abad, Pakistan 

    Turbidity

    0 JTU

    Dissolved Oxygen

    50% = 4ppm

    Ph

    7

    Temperature

    24°C

     

    The team plan to extend their intervention to streams and rivers in their locality and also plan to coordinate some interventions in the community for awareness-raising.

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    Poland

    The Krakow office of CH2M HILL hosted its first WWMD event on October 19. A group of 20 pupils from the Integration Primary School Nr.158 were shown a presentation on water quality, followed by a demonstration of the testing procedures. Then the students put their new skills to the test by gathering and testing water samples from the Wilga and Mlynowka rivers. Students discussed the results and ideas to improve water quality. The event concluded with awarding water quality certificates and the pupils proudly wore their WWMD stickers to announce their involvement.

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    Romania

    Ciclova

    Zece elevi din clasele V-VIII de la Scoala cu clasele I-VIII din localitatea Ciclova Romana, judetul Caras – Severin, Romania, au sarbatorit Ziua Mondiala a Monitorizarii Apei  in data de 18.09.2009. Elevii au monitorizat apa raului Nera, râu ce străbate Rezervatia naturala « Parcul National Cheile - Nerei Beusnita ».  Acestia au testat probele de apa din acest rau, cu ajutorul trusei de testare a apei aflata in dotarea scolii. Elevii au testat: oxigenul dizolvat (DO), aciditatea (ph), dar si claritatea( turbiditatea) sub indrumarea d-nei profesoare Lungu Cristina.

    Ten students from classes V-VIII of Ciclova-Romana School in Caras-Severin, Romania, celebrated World Water Monitoring Day on September 18, 2009. Students monitored the Nera River, which runs through the natural reserve "Parcul National Cheile - Nerei Beusnita". They tested water samples from the river with the school's testing equipment. Tests conducted by the students included: dissolved oxygen, pH, and clarity and were carried out under the guidance of teacher Cristina Lungu. 

    Galati

    "Water has been given the magic power to become the source of life on Earth." -Leonardo DaVinci


    Water is a substance essential for life. Without water, no living form could be conceived. It is necessary to mankind, to the animal world and also to the vegetal world.

    The activity developed by the students of School 2 Galati, Romania guided by teacher Viorica Cortojan was intended to experimentally study the qualities of water taken from different sources. Another important reason for the activity was that of developing the students' awareness and responsibility towards the protection of the environment.

    The objectives of the activity were: observing the pollution types of the water in two large water bodies, the rivers Siret and Danube; and analyzing the water samples with the help of the monitoring kits.

    In October and November groups of students from grade eight went to the banks of the rivers Danube and Siret where they could observe the quality of the water. On the banks of the rivers there were no solid wastes or wood gathered in the water. In that period there were no oil traces from motor boats.

    The Siret river was chosen as it is an important river flowing into the Danube and higher up from the place where water samples have been taken there are some animal farms that could influence the quality of the water. The water analyzed had no smell, no color but it contained tiny sand particles.

     

     

    Turbidity 

    Air Temp 

    DO 

    pH 

    The Danube (10/17/09)

    0

    17

    6

    7.5

    The Danube (11/20/09)

    0

    9

    7

    8

    The Siret (10/18/09)

    0

    18

    6

    7.5

    The Siret (11/21/2009)

    0

    11

    7

    7.5

     

    The conclusion is that the waters tested did not cross over the permitted limits for pH although they were at the superior limit. The students who participated in the activities asked questions referring to the water values obtained. They wanted to know what would happen if these values changed and what could be done for the water to keep measures within normal limits. They are looking forward to the next month's water analysis.
     

    Georgiana Munteanu, coordinator of school projects, wishes congratulations to all the participants in the WWMD program!
     

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    Spain

    ADECAGUA organized el Día Mundial del Control de la Calidad del Agua (World Water Monitoring Day) throughout Spain for the third consecutive year. The project is made possible by the assistance of the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente (the Spanish Ministry of Environment) and the Programa de Voluntariado en Rios (a national volunteer program for the protection of rivers). The 2009 campaign reached more than 20,000 people from schools, environmental education centers, Boy Scouts, the Red Cross, and many other organizations.

    Participants received a customized test kit, which contained the standard WWMD materials plus materials for testing nitrates and water hardness. Equipment for analyzing macroinvertebrates, riparian vegetation and pressures affecting the waterbody were also included. Results obtained have been submitted to WWMD for inclusion in the global database.

    ADECAGUA looks forward to continued collaboration for WWMD 2010 in order to promote broader public knowledge about water quality issues.

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    United Arab Emirates

    The Food Inspection students enthusiastically participated in their second year of the program, just like the first year. Their greatest success was monitoring water quality in the international program WWMD.

    They put extra effort into this project by carrying out water quality testing in different areas of Abu Dhabi Emirate. In this project the students went further than required by not only testing the physical parameters of water quality, but also the chemical parameters of water, such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, lead, molybdenum, zinc, chloride and fluoride.

    Although the students have finished their course, they hope that other students will continue to participate in this project and monitor the water quality in the UAE.

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    United States

    Arizona

    The Phoenix office of CH2M HILL participated in two local WWMD events. A WWMD event started by CH2M HILL a few years ago has now grown into a larger community festival. The World Water Festival is held at the Rio Salado Habitat Restoration Area, a CH2M HILL project site, and includes water quality monitoring, guided nature walks, and stations with information on rain harvesting, composting, and recycling, and magic shows.

    For the fifth year, more than 350 students from the Osborn Elementary School District (Phoenix, Ariz.) participated in World Water Monitoring Day activities under the auspices of CH2M Hill, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, and GateWay Community College.  The students conducted tests of Bird Lake, identified aquatic life, and learned about watersheds.  To read more about their effort, check out their story on azcentral.com.

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    California

    The Redding office of CH2M HILL partnered with Whiskeytown Environmental School to provide a community WWMD event on Saturday October 24, 2009. Whiskeytown Environmental School is a facility on Clear Creek near the Claire A. Hill Dam at Whiskeytown Lake. The school provides field trip opportunities and week-long stays to for children to learn about the environment.

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    Colorado

    Denver

    The Denver office of CH2M HILL partnered with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Colorado Department of Environmental Health to host a monitoring event for 50 fifth grade students at the South Platte River in Confluence Park. Stations provided supplemental learning on macroinvertebrates, pollution, and microbiology. Volunteers visited the classroom prior and after the event to show the video and explain the monitoring process, help the students load the data into the database, and discuss the findings and implications.

    In a second event, the community relations team from the Operations and Maintenance Business Group in Denver challenged co-workers to get out and monitor. Employees were divided into department teams to see which group could achieve the highest employee participation. Two out of the seven teams had every employee involved. Overall, 85 percent of Denver O&M employees participated in WWMD.

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    Denver

    On September 17, with the help of Keep it Clean Denver and Denver Colorado’s Public Works department, 20 Gilpin K-8 school students were joined by Denver Councilwoman Judy Montero to gather on the South Platte River at Commons Park to celebrate World Water Monitoring Day. 

    Led by members from FrontRange Earth Force and partners, students joined tens of thousands around the world in water testing and pollution prevention activities in local waterways. 

    “This point of the South Platte River is a special meeting point for many in the city of Denver, including people, businesses, and wildlife.  The significance of its importance will last for a long time and your act of preservation today will ensure the health of the river for generations to come.”  Councilwoman Montero kicked off the celebration by talking about her passion for rivers and their importance in Denver, Colorado.  She also discussed the importance of water monitoring, and the appreciation of the students’ concern and stewardship for the river’s well-being. 

    Along the South Platte River, the students took several water samples and tested the health of the river by measuring the temperature, pH, turbidity and dissolved oxygen levels.  Students also had the opportunity to search for macro invertebrates in the river which also indicate the health of the river.  With the find of a three-inch long crawdad, the South Platte River is proving to be in good health!

    FrontRange Earth Force teamed up with the Cottonwood Institute to engage Gilpin students in building public awareness and involvement in protecting the South Platte River.  The students also reflected and shared with the group their passions for water. 

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    Florida

    Ave Maria

    To further community awareness of the importance water quality, CH2M Hill in conjunction with Ave Maria Utility Company, LLLP (AMUC) conducted a WWMD workshop on December 9th in Ave Maria, Florida. The event was attended by approximately 50 elementary aged children and their parents and featured sampling and testing of five predominately residential stormwater lakes.  Project Manager, Jason Vogel officiated the workshop, discussing the water cycle, the importance of the region’s wetlands and practical ways for residents to help protect our water resources.  Under guidance of utility professionals from CH2M Hill and AMUC, the students conducted pH, D.O., turbidity, temperature, nitrate, and phosphate tests.  The results were compared and contrasted against pre-sampled and lab tested waters such as natural wetlands, agriculturally-influenced areas, and reclaimed wastewater.  The testing results showed the region’s water quality was very good.

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    Land O Lakes

    The village of Tanglewylde is located in the community of Oakstead which has over sixty lakes and ponds and hundreds of acres of conservation area and wetlands.  In 2006, there were about one hundred birds which visited Pond #54 in the Oakstead village of Tanglewylde daily—dozens of anhingas, and cormorants swimming in the pond and diving for fish.  There were dozens of egrets, herons, ibus, wood storks, and a couple of sand hill cranes as well as an alligator or two.  Then in 2007 the birds disappeared and the homeowners on Pond #54 became unhappy with the way management was maintaining the 2.5 acre storm water pond in their backyards. 

    The homeowners formed the Aloha Pond volunteers and entered the Adopt-A-Pond program.  The Adopt-A-Pond program is a community based volunteer program in Pasco County, Florida, co-sponsored by the County and the Southwest Florida Water Management District.  With their help, the volunteers identified what problems the pond was experiencing and looked for solutions. Erosion appeared to be caused by a lack of vegetation around the pond, which in turn was caused by excess spraying of herbicide and the way the rain water ran off rooftops.  The volunteers planted aquatic plants—arrowhead,pickerelweed, bulrush, golden canna, and cypress trees. 

    In July of 2008 the group held an official pond dedication of Aloha Pond and posted its Adopt-A-Pond sign.  The group feels that the pond is a asset to its community and a haven for wildlife including wading and fishing birds, turtles, alligators, deer, butterflies and song birds. In 2009, the group added a circle of life butterfly garden made from Florida native plants around its Adopt-A-Pond sign and became a National Wildlife Habitat.  

    In April, one volunteer secured a World Water Monitoring Day kit and began monitoring the pond because the birds still had not returned.  After testing, the volunteer concluded that the problem is that the pH of the pond is too high since most aquatic animals prefer a pH range of 6.5 to 8.0  Repeated tests from April to August showed pH averages well over 8. Twice the tests came back with a pH result of 10. Even though the pond's water was very warm at 32°C, the dissolved oxygen reading was consistently 4 ppm with a saturation percentage of around 55.

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    Georgia

    Atlanta

    The Sandy Springs office of CH2M HILL partnered with the First Montessori School of Atlanta to monitor the water quality in a stream located in one of the city’s parks, John Ripley Forbes Big Trees Preserve. CH2M HILL OMI staff helped the students sample the water in a stream running through the park and discussed water quality, non-point source pollution, and how they can help keep the stream clean.

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    Griffin

    Girl Scout Troop 358 registered Camp Cecil Jackson's (one of the local Girl Scout Camps) pond in Griffin, GA, USA for World Water Monitoring Day.  Girls in the troop have had the opportunity over the last few years to learn about water conservation with local programs at Cubihatcha Outdoor Center, Tussahaw Water Treatment Plant, Newman Wetlands Center, and Chattahoochee Nature Center located in their local community.  They have had the opportunity to earn their EPA Water Drop Patch, as well as Brownie Try-It and Junior Badge Requirements.  Rivers Alive and adopting a local park are two conservation programs the girls have volunteered their time.  The troop is looking forward to the continued monitoring of Camp Cecil Jackson Pond and learning more about water conservation for the stewardship of our public lands.

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    Idaho

    The Idaho Falls office of CH2M HILL hosted 75 members of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Magic Valley for a WWMD event in July. The kids ranging in age from 9 years old to teenagers tested water from the Snake River at Centennial Waterfront Park. Since the River was running higher and faster than normal, safety came first and CH2M HILL OMI employees collected the samples and took them to the main pavilion for the students to conduct the monitoring. CH2M HILL OMI operates the Twins Falls’ wastewater treatment plant.

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    Maine

    H2O News reports:

    Rotary Park on the banks of the Saco River in Biddeford, Maine, is the perfect spot for swimming, canoeing and fishing. But when local Girl Scouts visited on September 18, instead of bathing suits and beach towels, troop members brought sample jars and water testing kits from IDEXX. Their goal: assess the Saco’s water quality, as part of World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD).

    Guided by troop leader Patsy Root, area scouts collected samples to test for turbidity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH. Not only did the girls get first-hand experience in the science of water testing—they confirmed for themselves that the Saco is a healthy, safe source of drinking water. Additionally, Chris Mansfield, from Biddeford/Saco Water Company, used incubated, safety–sealed Colilert® samples and a battery-operated UV lamp to explain how the water company tests for Total Coliforms and E. coli, demonstrating that it can also be the things you don’t see that can make water unsafe.

    A Regulatory Affairs Specialist with IDEXX Water, Root and her scouts have participated in area WWMD for the past three years. The program raises awareness of the need to protect water resources by encouraging citizens to test their local bodies of water for toxins and bacteria. WWMD is supported by the U.S. EPA, Water Environment Federation, International Water Association and the U.S. Geological Survey.

    Root’s troop has taken the message of WWMD to heart. Area Girl Scouts have become more cognizant of their role in protecting the source of their drinking water. And by posting their data to the WWMD website, they’ve seen how their water compares to other sources around the world. Think globally, act locally: for Patsy Root and her scouts, it’s not just a catch phrase, it’s a call to action.

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    Massachusetts

    The Boston office of CH2M HILL partnered with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) to give presentations and host monitoring events at several schools. Volunteers attended an informational lunch session for training on the monitoring process in advance of the events, which also provided another opportunity for CH2M HILL participants to interact with a local client. From September 12 through November 9, 14 separate events were held at schools and community organizations in eastern Massachusetts, primarily in the greater Boston area. In all, more than 1,000 students learned about water quality monitoring and the importance of clean water. 

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    Michigan

    Ann Arbor

    On Thursday, June 4, 50 third- and fourth-grade students (plus two teachers) from Angell Elementary School in Ann Arbor, Michigan joined four students from the University of Michigan for a visit to the Huron River at Nichol's Arboretum. The "Arb" is a natural park for people in the area to enjoy wildlife.

    The Angell students collected nine water samples using WWMD test kits, and the university students used equipment they had brought from their lab.  The group completed four of the tests at the river and then returned to their classrooms where they made cultures of river water to test for bacteria content.

    The temperature of the water that the group examined was 20.6°C.  The DO was 6.6 ppm.  The pH was 8.6.  After they did the trubitity test, they thought that their water was pretty good quality because the turbidity was only 3 NTU. When they looked at the bacteria culture the next week, they saw 31 little colonies of coliforms or 1550 coliforms per 100 mL.

    The group selected this site because Ann Arbor gets the majority of its drinking water from the Huron River and because the Arb is a good place for the group to get access to the river. Days before the trip, it rained so it was humid, but sunny and warm.

    The students learned to test water to see if it is good quality.  They also thought it was interesting to see how much bacteria was in the water before it goes to the drinking water treatment plant in Ann Arbor.

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    Marine City

    On Saturday, September 26, 2009, Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan held the 42nd annual International River Crossing event with the Ontario Girl Guides, in Marine City, Michigan, along the St. Clair River. Approximately nine hundred girl participants, ages six to eighteen, engaged in water conservation activities which related to this years theme, “Friends Across All Waters”.

    At the World Water Monitoring Day Station, nineteen water samples were collected and tested between 8:45am and 1:40pm.  For most of the day the weather conditions were cloudy and hazy, after a night of light rainfall.  Many girls were engaged in the experience of conducting the water experiments for WWMD and patiently waited to see the results.  They were proud to be a part of a world-wide event and look forward to seeing their results on the WWMD website.

    The St. Clair River, along with Lake St. Clair and the Detroit River, connect two Great Lakes—Lake Huron to the north and Lake Erie to the south.  It is a major waterway for freighter traffic and sport boats.  It also provides a link between the United States and Canada via ferry boats with immigration stations on both sides.

    The Girl Scouts also learned of the St. Clair River Watershed, signed “Take Action—We Care About Great Lake Water Quality” banners (which will be sent to state legislators), and looked through microscopes at water impurities. The sixty foot tri-maran Earth Voyager crew was present to tell the girls about its efforts to educate the public about the Great Lakes water conservation.

    Many girls crossed the river via the Blue Water Ferry to participate in activities in Sombra, Ontario.  Learning and appreciating our wonderful waterways was part of the fun at this year’s event!

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    Minnesota

    The Minneapolis office of CH2M HILL presented to two fifth grade classes at Keewaydin Middle School on September 24. The six employee volunteers then led the students to Lake Nokomis. Students, parents, teachers, and CH2M HILL volunteers worked together taking samples and using WWMD Testing Kits to monitor the water quality in the lake. The fifth graders showed their enthusiasm for WWMD both in the classroom and outside at the lake. Students did a great job and were given individual certificates for their completion on the WWMD activity.

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    Missouri

    St. Louis

    The St. Louis office of CH2M HILL partnered with the St. Louis Academy of Science to host “Hoots, Squeaks, and Creeks: An evening adventure in Forest Park” on Friday, September 25. The event targeted Junior Academy members, grades 6-12. CH2M HILL designed many aspects of the new waterways throughout the park and established water quality objectives and best practices to improve the water quality of the park and enhance the biodiversity of the system. After the monitoring participants were led went on a nature walk for an owl prowl and bat blitz in the park.

    Springfield

    Residents of Southwest Missouri enjoy beautiful creeks, streams and lakes and don’t take them for granted.  A number of grass-roots organizations as well as local governments have worked together for decades to protect and preserve the quality of the water in this area.  This collaboration of a number of both professional and trained volunteer conservation/ environmental education service providers has an established track record of working together on many projects to bring educational information and experiences to the community. 

    September 12 marked a day of celebration of many of these efforts.  One of the leading organizations, the Watershed Committee of the Ozarks threw quite a party—educational fun for the kids, celebratory speeches and presentations of congratulations by local, county and state dignitaries, a cook-out and canoe races!  Surprise recognition was given to Loring Bullard, Director of the Watershed Committee, celebrating his 20th Anniversary with the organization.

    Along with the Anniversary celebration was a celebration of World Water Monitoring Day—taking advantage of the events of the day and the people who would be attending.  Nearly 300 people attended, with approximately 75 children taking part in the activities planned just for them, courtesy of a grant from the Missouri Water Environment Association (MWEA) in cooperation with a number of partnering agencies and organizations. A live directory listing of these and other Southwest Missouri organizations committed to environmental/conservation education can be seen at www.OzarksEnvironment.com in the Resources Section.

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    New Hampshire

    It was a beautiful, crisp fall morning when the sixth graders from James Mastricola Upper Elementary School in Merrimack went to Baboosic Brook.  The students divided up into 4 small groups and surveyed different sites that run through Twin Bridge Park.

    Monitoring tests showed the pH to be a healthy 7, DO 8 ppm, and turbidity a clear 0 JTU.  The water temperature was a cool 8°C, while the air temperature was about 20°C.   


    This was the group's first year participating in WWMD, "but we enjoyed it so much, I am sure the school will be back again next year.  We have two other rivers ( Souhegan and Merrimack) that we hope to include in the future," remarked teacher Dennis Pymm.

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    North Carolina

    A class at Exploris Middle School in Raleigh studied a small creek that may flow into the larger tributary of Cemetery Branch. The class was made up of two groups of 16 eighth graders. Each group went on a different day— the first on August 19th and the other on August 20th. The principal of Exploris lives directly in front of this small creek and has some of it flowing over his property. He has cleaned the creek up and planted both native and noninvasive plants around it.

    Why does the health of this creek matter? Cemetery Branch is one of many streams that flow into the Neuse River, one of three river basins that is entirely within North Carolina. The Neuse River is also the main drinking water supply to many North Carolinia residents. Cemetery Branch is only a mile away from the Governor’s Mansion and a mile north of Exploris Middle School. Click here to read the group's full report.

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    Ohio

    On an overcast and chilly late October day, eleven 4th and 5th grade students, along with teachers of the Stone Hebrew Academy participated in the Worldl Water Monitoring Day project. The Jewish National Fund, JNF, contacted the school and provided the information necessary for the school’s full participation. The Stone Hebrew Academy is located on the site of the Jewish Community Center, so the students decided to examine two water areas behind the JCC. The first area was the large pond on the JCC site, and the other area was the run off creek by the pond. Water samples were drawn from each area. The turbidity of the water, as well as water temperature, the percentage of saturation of the water sample, pH count and air temperature were all recorded. The students were careful to follow scientific protocol. The results were downloaded on the World Water Monitoring Site.  The students were very enthusiastic and took the experiment seriously. “Ooh, I sure wouldn’t want to drink that water!” remarked one student after examining the cloudy water. Students helped each other, and they were careful to wear protective eye gear and gloves. Hats off to Mrs. Nicar, Mrs. Diamond, Mrs. Garsek and the 4th and 5th Grade students!

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    Pennsylvania

    The Philadelphia office of CH2M HILL partnered with EarthForce, an environmental education program, and Cedarbrook Middle School for the sixth year to implement a WWMD event. Eight classes of seventh grade students from Cedarbrook Middle School collected and monitored four samples per class from Rock Creek, a suburban stream running through moderate urban and commercial development in Cheltenham, Pennsylvania. Additional samples were collected for the analyses of phosphate and nitrate, and a more quantitative method was implemented for turbidity.  Kick nets were used to collect macroinvertebrates in the stream substrate.

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    Puerto Rico

    The San Juan office of CH2M HILL hosted two monitoring events for local students. On September 30, employees took students from Juan B. Miranda School to La Plata Reservoir at Toa Alta, Puerto Rico to monitor the water quality and on October 1, employees took students from Fowler’s Academy to the Mariquita Creek at Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. Fun was had by all as the students learned about pH, temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen and the impact each parameter has on water quality and aquatic life.

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    Texas

    Dallas

    The Dallas office of CH2M HILL hosted a WWMD event for 60 fifth grade students from Macon Elementary School at Elam Creek. Access to the creek was limited due to vegetation and mud and the engineers chose to collect the water for the students and transport it to a safe area outside the creek limits. The students were divided into 10 groups and then led through the tests where CH2M HILL engineers and scientists explained each water quality parameter and engaged the students in discussions about what they could infer about the water quality based on the test results.

    Houston

    The Houston office of CH2M HILL visited the fourth grade class at Thornwood Elementary School to celebrate WWMD on September 29. Six employees participated and gave presentations and answered students’ questions before helping the class of 60 students test three different water samples. The students tested water from a lake southwest of Houston and raw water from the City of Houston’s East Water Treatment Plant and contrasted them to the drinking water at the school. The children were excited to do the water testing, especially since they got to wear rubber gloves.

    San Antonio

    The San Antonio office of CH2M HILL teamed with several local clients and partners, including City of San Antonio, San Antonio Water System, San Antonio River Authority, Greater Alliance of Edward Aquifer Authority, and representatives from the Girls Scouts to host an event for nearly 500 fifth graders from four local elementary schools. During the event, young participants gained a deeper understanding of water quality and environmental stewardship. The up-and-coming scientists tested water from Woodlawn Lake and Leon Creek, and were also exposed to dynamic hands-on technical presentations from each partner about water budgets, water distribution systems, natural aquifer systems, and watershed management.

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    Virginia

    On Friday, September 18, Girl Scout Troops 270, 168 and 230 of Virginia Skyline Council met at Peaks View Park in Lynchburg to clean the local park pond. This particular pond acts as a retention pond for a recently installed parking lot. The park is maintained by Lynchburg Parks & Recreation Department and is popular with the public. In spite of the pond’s function to capture runoff, it had developed into a wonderful wildlife habitat for various types of reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrates and birds.

    Ten Girl Scouts and eight adults (including the facilitator Park Naturalist Kathie Driscoll) attended the World Water Monitoring Day event. The day began wet and gloomy, but the sun broke through the clouds and proved to be perfect weather for the troops to partake in this experience. The girls collected and tested the water samples. They were split up into two groups: one to determine the turbidity and the other to test the pH and dissolved oxygen of the pond water. All of the girls were more than excited and eager to be able to participate and partake in conducting the water sampling as well as determine the results of the quality of water for pond life.

    They were proud to be a part of World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) and care for their community pond as well! As a reflection project the Girl Scouts decorated and displayed a rainbarrel at the Lynchburg Parks & Recreation Department’s nature center for public education.

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    Washington

    The Walla Walla office of CH2M HILL worked with local Boy Scout Troop #305 for its WWMD event. Lab Analyst, Nela Rice, guided three Boy Scouts to four streams in Walla Walla. The boys were enthusiastic about performing the tests, enjoyed going to the different collection sites, learned safety techniques, and had fun during the entire event. This is the fourth year that Walla Walla has participated in WWMD.

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    Wisconsin

    Madison

    On Friday, May 8, 2009, nine 4th grade girls from Girl Scout Troop 871 surveyed the creek that edges along their school, Henry David Thoreau Elementary.  The creek leads into Lake Wingra, a small lake nearby that has lots of visible algae in it during the summer months.  The creek is fun to play in when it is nice outside.  The kids were curious about their creek.  Is it a healthy creek?  Is it contributing to the weeds in Lake Wingra?


    The girls and their leaders surveyed the creek using monitoring equipment supplied by the World Water Monitoring Day program.  They sampled two sites, one just behind the school yard, and the other a half mile away, closer to the lake.  Surveys at both sites included temperature measurements, pH, dissolved oxygen content, and turbidity (using a mini Secchi disk).

    The creek measured a healthy 8 ppm for dissolved oxygen and a pH of 7 at both sites, and turbidity measured at 40 JTU.  The water temperature was 20 degrees Celcius.  It was good to see that this creek that runs through a residential neighborhood was in pretty good shape!

    Milwaukee

    The Milwaukee office of CH2M HILL partnered with the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD), an important local client, to host a fifth grade class from Cass Street School at the MMSD headquarters located on the Milwaukee River. Due to inclement weather, the team collected samples from the river and brought them inside for the students to test. A presentation kicked off the event before the monitoring began. After a presentation, the students broke into groups to test their samples. One of the groups used a YSI, a monitoring device used in the field. A CH2M HILL employee visited the class after the event to discuss the results and the importance of water quality.

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    Vietnam

    On September 19, 2009 sixty-seven students from the Department of Chemical Process Equipment and the Department of Physical Chemistry – Hanoi University of Technology - Vietnam joined in the World Water Monitoring Day event. It was the first event organized in Vietnam. The participants were proud of being the people who started this meaningful activity in Vietnam, and it is expected to be extended all over the country in the next years.


    The selected site was Ba Mau Lake, considered as a “green lung” of the surrounding residential area. Before testing the water sample in the lake, the students had been provided sufficient information on the WWMD event by the organizers and from the website.

    The students were divided into four groups and charged with collecting and testing water samples from four different points around the lake. The average temperature of the water that the groups examined was 30°C, the DO was 6 ppm, the turbidity was 100 JTU and the pH was 8.0.

    Although it was an oppressively hot day, the students felt highly enthusiastic about testing the water quality of the lake by themselves. They also found that it is their responsibility to propagate this activity through the University as well as the community in order to raise public awareness about water quality protection. Click here to see the group's report.

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