On Location

2008 Participant Stories

12/1/2008
Submitted by 2008 Participant Stories

 

Argentina 
Armenia 
Australia 
Belarus 
Brazil 
Bulgaria 
Cameroon 
Chile 
China 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 
Ecuador 
Hungary 
India 
Indonesia 
Israel 
Latvia 
Lithuania 
Macedonia 
Malaysia 
Mexico 
Nepal 
Pakistan 
Philippines 
Poland 
Portugal 
Romania 
Singapore 
Spain 
Sudan 
Swaziland 
Taiwan 
Thailand 
Trinidad & Tobago 
Turkey 
United Arab Emirates 
United States 

Argentina

Sixty students at CEI San Ignacio school in Paraje San Cabao (10 kilometers from Junín de los Andes), Argentina recently conducted water quality testing of the Chimehuín River in honor of World Water Monitoring Day. The Chimehuín originates at Lake Huechulafquen (in Lanín National Park), flows past the school, then flanks the city of Junín de los Andes, and finally flows into another river.

Sampling of the Chimehuín was conducted in different places.  As part of the GLOBE program, the students monitor the river at its banks close to the school on a weekly basis (see their GLOBE data here). WWMD provided a good opportunity to sample at other locations such as the river's origin, elsewhere on the school grounds, various sites in Junín de los Andes, and at the outflow of sewers.  The sampling was repeated on different days.

The population of Junín de los Andes has grown a lot in recent years. Its water supply stems from the Chimehuín. The city extracts water for aquatic production, agribusiness and small industries. CEI San Ignacio extracts water for human consumption, caretaking of animals, and irrigation of gardens, greenhouses and pastures. The Chimehuín River is also used recreationally by swimmers, sports enthusiasts and fishermen. This more extensive sampling along the course of the river shows that the water quality continues to be good, even as the river flows through town. Read the report en español. Read the full research report en español.

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Armenia

On September 18, the ecological NGO Sustainable Water Environment carried out monitoring of two Armenian rivers—Aghstev and Vanadzor—belonging to Kura river basin.  The Kura is one of the major rivers in South Caucasus. Supported by GWP CACENA and the Country Water Partnership of Armenia, monitoring activities were carried out using the kits provided by the International Water Association. About 25 students from higher educational institutions in two Armenian towns took part in the monitoring. The rivers were selected for study by the students who were concerned with their pollution.

The Aghstev is a transboundary river that emerges within Armenia and flows to neighboring Azerbaijan. The river flows through the town of Ijevan and is polluted with both household wastewater and solid household waste. The Vanadzor River is of local importance. The river flows through the town of Vanadzor and makes an artificial lake in the town center, which is used by the population for recreational purposes. The study of the Aghstev River was done in the most polluted part of the river, near the town market. The Vanadzor was studied in the resort area of Vanadzor and at the artificial lake in the town center.

The results showed that the Vanadzor River had a water temperature of 16°C and a dissolved oxygen content of 4 mg/l, which means the oxygen saturation was only 41%. The pH was a little on the alkaline side at 8.

The water quality in the artificial lake in the town center was worse with the water temperature at 20°C and dissolved oxygen at 2 mg/l (only 22% saturation). The pH was decidedly alkaline at 9, and the lake water surface was completely covered with algae.

The Aghstev had better oxygen saturation at 88%; however, the pH was again high at 9.

The students concluded that the artificial lake in the Vanadzor town center is polluted and dangerous to use for recreational purposes. Though the rivers are polluted with household wastewater and waste, their self-cleaning level is high since they are rapidly running mountain rivers, and aeration processes work quickly in flowing water.

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Australia

At 10:25 a.m. on October 16, the year seven class from Kearnan College, Manjimup, Western Australia, traveled to the Warren Bridge to collect some data for their Water Monitoring Day. This site was the second site of the four that the group tested.

The water was collected from a flowing river. There was some vegetation around this river such as the peppermint trees and bracken fern. This site was also covered by gravel and dry sand. Warren Bridge is a recreational area for the locals. Fishing and catching marronare the main activities.

The group noticed the roman numerals XXVI on the poles supporting the bridge. Though the students knew that XXVI means "26", they were not sure of the number's significance.

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Belarus

Minsk

On October 18, a group of five people from Gymnasium 12 (Nadezhda Popkova, Ivan Azhgirey, Dmitry Stefanyuk, Alexander Demyanov and teacher Tatyana Stefanyuk) took part in the World Water Monitoring Day.

This event was in the centre of Minsk, Belarus in Gorky Park. The students collected three samples and tested the water in the main river, the River Svisloch. The group was surprised to see that the water from the Svisloch was clear. The site of the river appeared to be in good condition without any rubbish. The students observed some ducks and fish. The team chose that site in the centre of the city to see the real condition of the water.

"We like our city very much and we want to see Minsk clear, nice and beautiful. We think such events are very important and useful for us and for all people," said one student.

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Shchuchin

A group of students consisting of four girls (Veronica Baltrukevich, Tatiana Sevko, Victoria Gudach and Olga Gligan) took part in the research by monitoring the condition of the manmade lake situated in the town of Shchuchin on  the small river Turovka.

The lake has the area of 0.5 hectares and is used as a recreation site. The research on the condition of the water was held from the end of October till December. During this research, the temperature of water and air was defined. With the help of the equipment and reagents, the group measured the clarity of the water, pH and dissolved oxygen.

Studying the data, the group came to the conclusion that the main indices of water quality had not changed considerably, and that they are within the limits of tolerable norms. The group did observe the alteration of acid in the basin with the pH rising to 8 on both November 11 and December 3; however, the group attributes this to a rain event which may have caused water to drain from the nearby road.

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Brazil

Tijuca

Água em Unidade de Conservação (a partnership program sponsored by Programa Petrobras Ambiental) is training 80 teenagers to become activists in the environmental field. These teens recently gathered at Lago dos Patos, a small waterfall in Tijuca National Park, to test the water for pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen and turbidity in honor of World Water Monitoring Day. The results showed that the lake is in good condition for its fauna (native and exotic fishes) and flora (aquatic plants and plankton).

Professor Delmo Vaitsman, Ph.D., a partner of the project, presented a lecture about water monitoring to the teens. They also participated in an online chat with peers who were conducting the same tests in the northeastern region of Brazil. Thus, the two projects were able to exchange information about World Water Monitoring Day in Brazil.

Água em Unidade de Conservação is building a strong network of partners called Rede de Proteção ao Parque Nacional da Tijuca to mobilize every citizen to protect the Atlantic Forest and its biodiversity in Tijuca National Park. Tijuca is a draw for tourists, as it is home to the 125-foot (38-meter) statue Cristo Redentor or "Christ the Redeemer".

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Santa Catarina

Since 2002, the Oceanography, Environmental Engineering and Biology Graduation Courses from UNIVALI (Universidade do Vale do Itajaí) has hosted community events focusing on water quality under the supervision of teacher Kátia Naomi Kuroshima and assistance of Maycon Furtado.

This year, these events were part of World Water Monitoring Day. Water testing was done over three days, on June 5; and on October 3 and 7. The first event was held at Kät Schurmann Institute, coordinate by Mrs. Janete Vasques. During October, the event took place at Municipal School Professora Idília Machado Ferreira and was directed by Luciana Passos Bento with participation of teachers Daniel Barreto da Costa, Neide B. Mathiola and Claudete N. A. Krueger.

During theses activities, the children and communities collected the water samples for the chemical analyses. The water samples were taken from local environments: rivers, waterfalls, and water used in their residences. During collection time, the children were instructed to determine the temperature of the water. They also conducted chemical tests for pH, ammonium, phosphate and dissolved oxygen), as well as conducted microbiology tests (fecal and total coliforms and salmonella).

Fifty water samples were analyzed this year with participation around 150 people. The undergraduate students working during these events were: Monaliza Melo, Tiago Peixer, Jaqueline Krueger, Vanuza Borges, Ana Lúcia Zonta, Camila Burigo Marin and Marcos Saboya.

The samples were collected from river, and seawater influenced environments, so the chemical parameters showed a great variation. The dissolved oxygen showed a great variation with a minimum of 3.6mg-O2/L and a maximum of 12.4mg-O2/L. The inorganic nutrients showed a low concentration in most samples. The maximum concentration of ammonium and phosphate were respectively, 3.0mg-N/L and 0.6mg-P/L. pH oscillated from 3 to 10, however, the majority of the samples (63%) had presented values between 7 and 8. The chloride ions were measured, too, to evaluate the influence of seawater in underground water. In this region, most of the people used the underground water for household purposes and when this use exceeds the rainwater input, the salinization of water can occur. The chloride concentrations were very low in most of the samples; just 6 samples (12%) showed a 2mg-Cl/L. In relation to the microbiological analysis, it was concerning to find that 22 samples were very contaminated with coliforms.

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São Paulo

The Project of Revitalization of Springs of the Environmental Bureau of São José dos Campos/São Paulo, Brazil has been developed in 30 springs located in urban areas. The environmental education involves 32 public schools to rise the awareness and sensibilization the pupils on how important the spring's regeneration and conservation are. This project also works on water conservation issues and sustainable use of water. One of the activities involves water monitoring visits with kids. Some of the parameters that are measured are: pH, turbidity, temperature, nitrate, phosphate, dissolved oxygen (DO) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). These parameters are measured by educational kits by the pupils and a proper water quality laboratory towards monitoring of the results.

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Bulgaria

On December 13, nine students from Varna Secondary School of Economics (George St. Rakovsky) participated in the WWMD event in Varna, Bulgaria. The group's guide was Mrs. Nelly Vicheva, biology and health education teacher.

The students conducted water quality of the Black Sea coast near one of the most popular Bulgarian resorts, St. Konstantin and Elena, near Varna. They selected this site because it is a favourite place for tourists from all over the world during the summer, thus the water must be clear. Ten samples were collected by the students, who found their site to be in good condition for sustaining life. Click here to see their full report.

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Cameroon

In the framework of the World Water Monitoring Day, activities were carried out at the University of Dschang on the 18th September and the 18th October 2008. The 14-person team, four ladies and ten gentlemen, worked under the supervision of Dr. Théophile Fonkou.

Participants included: NOUMSI Bernadette (MSc in Ecology), NDOUNLA Juliette (MSc in Water Ecology), MBAKOU KEMTSA Pierre (MSc in Animal Biology), DONFACK Tazo Eric (Undergraduate), TSAGUE Jiofack Fabrice (Undergraduate),DJOUENANG Sévérin (Swim Master, Municipal Lake Dschang), AKO Charlotte (MSc in Water Management), KUETCHE Simplice (MSc Water Management), MBOGOL III Isaac G. (MSc Water Management), MEKONTSO Fabrice (MSc Water Management), NUMBESI Susana (MSc student Water Management), TCHEUKO François( MSc in Water Management), and ZEBAZE François (MSc Water Management).

The Dschang Municipal Lake was chosen as the site for investigations. Water quality monitoring was done through onsite and laboratory physicochemical analysis. The celebration started with a field lecture by Dr. Théophile Fonkou on the importance of the Day, and the different parameters and techniques used in water quality monitoring. The WWMD kit granted to the team by the Water Environment Federation was then presented to the crew. The significance of parameters like pH, turbidity, temperature, conductivity, total dissolved solids, dissolved oxygen, nitrate-nitrogen and orthophosphates was explained to the participants.

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Chile

AquaSendas is a non-for-profit community organization dedicated to creating awareness and including citizenry in the conservation of Chilean aquatic ecosystems. The COPAS Center is devoted to advanced basic scientific research on the circulation, biogeochemical cycling, ecology and paleoceanography of the Eastern South Pacific Ocean. Both institutions have joined efforts to develop a nationwide network of public schools as stewards of local waterbodies and to strengthen k-12 water curricula.

Thanks to the support of WEF and IWA, schools from six regions received a WWMD kit and started monitoring waterbodies in their watersheds. Urban lakes, wetlands, rivers, creeks and coastal zones were among the 36 aquatic environments monitored by almost 600 students, parents and teachers, each of whom carried out at least one measurement. Participant schools extended in this long and narrow country from a city in the Atacama desert (latitude  23.6°S)—one of the driest deserts in the world—to a town between the North and South Ice Fields of Patagonia (latitude 47.8°S).

WWMD has been included as an extra programmatic activity in the curriculum of the Aqua chilensis program that COPAS-AquaSendas is developing for public schools next year. Students are making their own Secchi disk to measure transparency and manual sounders to measure water depth. Another important spin-off from this wonderful experience is that science teachers and environmental educators are discovering that local waterbodies are a great pedagogical resource to advance ecological concepts that students would otherwise learn just from textbooks.

In late November, students and teachers who participated in the WWMD '08 event gathered at the Marine Biology Station of the University of Concepción. The fifth Meeting of Young Water Explorers, organized by undergraduate students of the Oceanography Department, COPAS and AquaSendas, allowed middle school students to present their results, learn from their peers and share their common interest in outdoor science and appreciation for the blue planet.

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China

Anhui Province

Members of the microbiology team at the Nature Preservation Association (University of Science and Technology) monitored two sites at Chaohu Lake in Anhui province, China.  What the team encountered at the lake is an ongoing threat for residents—human and not.

Blue-green algae has been growing profusely in Chaohu, which is China's fifth largest body of fresh water and the drinking water source for some 320,000 people.

“Microcystis [a type of blue-green algae] grows crazily every year and produces a poison called MC. When monitoring the sample, we had to filter first, or we couldn’t see anything through the water. It was deadly green,” said team leader Silong Wang.

The team plans to continue work on Chaohu and neighboring wetlands such as Shengjin Lake, a national nature reserve, and Poyang Lake, which is home to a variety of birds.

A couple weeks following their WWMD tests, the team members revisited Chaohu and observed more than a thousand wild ducks. Wang and her teammates were encouraged by the site and believe this means there is still hope for Chaohu.

According to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, ingestion of waters containing high concentrations of Microcystis can cause abdominal stress in humans and can kill wildlife that consume significant quantities of it.

Click on the below links for related articles:
http://www.mwr.gov.cn/english/20080506/90524.asp
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24467924/ 

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Hong Kong

To enhance awareness and involvement of the community in the protection of water quality, the Hong Kong (China) Regional Committee of the International Water Association (IWAHK) organized a launching ceremony of World Water Monitoring Day 2008 (WWMD) on 28 September at the High Island Reservoir. The event was co-hosted by the Education Bureau, the Environmental Protection Department, the Drainage Services Department and the Water Supplies Department of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). 

This is the fifth consecutive year that IWAHK organized the World Water Monitoring Day in Hong Kong.  Mrs. Carrie LAM, the Secretary for Development of HKSAR, officiated the ceremony and said that we should try our best to protect our water sources from being contaminated and build up a habit of saving water so as to contribute to the sustainable development of our society.

More than 300 secondary school representatives from 32 schools attended the ceremony. Under the guidance of chemists from the Water Supplies Department on site, the students used handy test kits to measure four basic indicators: temperature, acidity, dissolved oxygen and turbidity.  The testing result showed that of water at the reservoir was of very good quality. 

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Costa Rica

Mercedes Sur is a small town located near Heredia, Costa Rica. Since 2005, it has practiced an integrated watershed management process with participation of the local government, primary and secondary schools, Universidad Nacional (a public university), public and private institutions, NGOs, industries and citizens. The Mercedes Sur Blue Flag Committee, a volunteer group representing the institutions and groups involved, is the leader of the process.
 

Since 2006, the Mercedes Sur Blue Flag Committee has sampled Burío River in four points located across the town, and included the information in the WWMD website. This year, eight members of the Committee participated in two events: one on October 10 (two samples were collected) and the other on December 3 (another two samples were collected).

The participants used a monitoring kit developed by the River Management Laboratory of the Chemistry School of Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica. They decided to monitor the Burío River because is a very vulnerable urban stream which is part of the past, present and future life of the community of Mercedes Sur.

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Cuba

On October 13 at 9:00 am, the Cuba GSA (Global Sports Alliance) Team departed to the Guamá River, a great natural reservoir that goes around the westernmost head city of Cuba, Pinar del Río. This activity was organized by captain Lic. Fernando Emilio Valladares Fuente with the aim of monitoring the quality of water in the province. The team was eager to contribute to the international WWMD program and to the Ecoflag movement.

The Cuba GSA Team used the test kit provided by this program with the purpose of preserving and enhancing water environment as one of the activities strongly coordinated by both projects, the GSA and The WWMD. This test kit showed the following results:

 

 

Site 1 

Date

October 7, 2008

Place

Guamá River, Pinar del Río, Cuba

Air Temperature

30  C

Water temperature

28   C

Oxygen Dissolved

4 PPM

PH

7

Turbidity

40  JTU

 

After deep analysis, the team found that the neutral pH of the Guamá River was conducive to supporting wildlife; however, the group stated that some measures would have to be taken not to accelerate pollution and rising water temperatures. The Guamá River flows to some damns around which many people live and fish.

The Cuba GSA team will continue evaluating some other reservoirs and will develop actions of prevention and intervention in the community. Some of the members of this activity were: Jorge Labrador, Juan Carlos Puente, Yosbel Gener, Alyagna Alonso, Jorge Rafael Cueto, Jose Luis Estrada, Aliandi Diaz, Roysel Samora, Wilfredo Gallardo, Alain Rojas, Jorge Angel Lemus.

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Ecuador

El Chaco, Napo Province

On October 17, the NGO EcoCiencia (Fundación Ecuatoriana de Estudios Ecológicos) carried out the WWMD in the Andes in the Amazonian basin at the rivers Quijos and Oyacachi. These rivers are important tributaries of the Napo River, the biggest river in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Monitoring activities were possible using the kits provided by the International Water Association. About six high school students from Colegio Nacional El Chaco joined the monitoring day.

These rivers were selected by the students because they are very important sites for kayaking and rafting. In 2005, the World Rafting Championship took place in the Quijos. For local people, these rivers are very important for attracting tourists to their town. Both rivers are "born" in the western slope of the Andes from the glacier volcanos Cayambe and Antisana. Both of their watersheds in the upper part of the páramos (grasslands of high altitude above 3000 meters) are very important because this ecosystem provides water for Quito, Ecuador's capital.

The results for both rivers indicated that dissolved oxygen content was 8ppm, and the pH was 8 (a bit alkaline). Turbidity for the Quijos River was 40 JTU, which was probably due to rain in the watershed upstream. Turbidity for the Oyacachi was 0 JTU. The water temperature for both sites was about 12°C. The water is cold because the monitoring sites are at 1600 meters above sea level in the upper Amazonia in the Andes. The students were happy to know that their rivers still have good conditions for practicing water sports and for attracting tourists to their town.

In addition to these rivers, the students collected data from another stream, which is also important for local people because it provides water for the local water supply system. The results showed 8 ppm of dissolved oxygen, a pH of 8 and water temperature of 14°C. It was important for the students to know about the water quality of the stream that provides water to their houses.

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Noroccidente de Quito

Monitoring activities were carried out on November 5 in the northwestern part of the Province of Pichincha, approximately one and a half to two hours from Quito, the capital of Ecuador. The participants included 13 Einstein School eleventh-graders that take IB Biology at either the standard level or the higher level, as well as three biology teachers.

Water samples were taken from four rivers in the area.  The team was unable to learn the names of two of the rivers, but the others were identified as the Pahuma and the Tandayapa.  Two water samples were taken from each river; and each sample was tested for pH, turbidity, temperature and dissolved oxygen.  In addition, the team recorded counts for total coliform bacteria, noted fecal coliform levels and observed aquatic macroinvertebrates.

This area, which lies in the foothills of the Andes Mountains, has a hot and very humid climate. The environment surrounding the rivers consists mainly of forests without much human intervention and small towns with farm animals living alongside species inherent to the area, especially birds.  We chose the rivers in this area because we had previous knowledge that they were not critically polluted, so we knew that we would not expose the students to the danger of infection, nor to the risk of coming into contact with any dangerous or toxic material.  The water was, in fact, clean and clear. 

The students were enthusiastic and highly motivated before, during and after the field work. Beforehand, they prepared themselves by doing research on the topic and on the area.  Later, in the field, they conducted their work with responsibility and obtained accurate data.  Afterwards, they processed the information and drew conclusions about their findings. 

In a final reflection after all of the stages of the work had been completed, the students expressed a sense of satisfaction that they had been able to take part in this project.  They realized that they had learned a great deal about the topic and had visited sites in their country that they were unfamiliar with and that were very different from their own reality.  They were also proud to have collaborated with a large-scale project that contributes to the good of the planet.

Finally, the students recommended that the school take part in this project every year.  They considered two options:  either taking samples from the same rivers in order to make comparisons over time, or working at other sites in order to have samples from different areas of the country as input for determining priority sites for conservation efforts.

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Riobamba

On November 6, 40 students monitored three rivers around Riobamba with the assistance of NGOs EcoCiencia (Fundación Ecuatoriana de Estudios Ecológicos) and Fundación Natura, the Universidad Nacional del Chimborazo (UNACH), and Riobamba's Water Company, Empresa Municipal de Agua Potable y Alcantarillado (EMAPAR). The students were from three local high schools—Colegio Riobamba, Colegio La Providencia and Colegio Bernardo Dávalos.

Monitoring took place at Río Cajabamba, Río Chimborazo and Río Guano. These rivers flow from high altitude grasslands (páramos), and the Río Chimborazo's origin is the glacier melting off of the highest volcano in Ecuador—Chimborazo (6310 meters above sea level). In the upper part of their watersheds, these streams are used for irrigation of potato crops by indigenous communities. In the case of the Río Guano, all untreated sewage water from the town of Guano winds up in the river. In this town, handicrafts are made from cow leather, which is also processed locally. Many pollutants drain into the river, including some heavy metals such as chrome. All three rivers have low dissolved oxygen levels of 4 ppm and slightly alkaline water (pH 8). In the Río Cajabamba, the turbidity was 40 JTU. The turbidity for Río Chimborazo was 100 JTU and the worse case was Río Guano with turbidity over 100 JTU.

A small opening ceremony was organized by EMAPAR to begin the monitoring day. This event was part of the nightly news on the local TV station. This helped to let people know about the importance of water quality. EMAPAR has decided to start an environmental education program for all Riobamba citizens.

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Hungary

Debrecen

The students from the DE Kossuth Lajos Gyakorlo Altalanos Iskolaja school in Hungary created a movie in order to share their WWMD experience in 2008. To view it, click here.

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Keszthely

From September 18 until October 18 was the World Water Monitoring Day. János Nagyváthy Secondary School (Keszthely, Hungary) registered a monitoring site, and the students began to take bits of water from Lake Balaton. Balaton is the nearest lake to the school, and it is also the biggest lake in Hungary and Central Europe.

Students measured the dissolved oxygen of the lake. The test tablets showed the group how many molecules of oxygen were in the water. For the next test, students measured the acidity of the water with a scale. After inserting the test tablets, the reacted sample was compared to the color chart. Finally the group measured for temperature.

"It was very exciting, and the tool kits were easy and fun to use," said teacher Mariann Busznyákné Kovács. "Measuring was very interesting, and we think it’s really important to know this information. Taking part in an international event like this is also an exceptional possibility to see others care for the environment and water quality, which is very important to our future."

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India

New Delhi

Yamuna: The Life Line of Delhi – Under the Nationwide CLEAN-India programme (Community Led Environment Action network) of Development Alternatives, river water and drinking water quality is being monitored by school students using the Jal-TARA water quality monitoring developed by Development Alternatives (for testing for 14 parameters).


Water quality of River Yamuna has been monitored since 1994. Ram Ghat, where a board with Do’s and Don’t’s is displayed for the residents, was adopted by the CLEAN-India students. A cement tank has also been constructed for the composting of flowers (offerings), and the students clean up the river banks as “Shramdan” (voluntary service). The temple priest was also convinced and gave his support. Till 2002, the Ghat was clean (as seen in the top photo). Then many settlements came up near the river and the untreated drains from these joined the river directly near Ram Ghat. Now this stretch is completely covered with water hyacinth(as seen in the bottom photo), DO is zero, it is highly turbid, and phosphate levels are above 1 mg/l. So now devotees have to go 3-4 kilometers upstream. The CLEAN-India team has had discussions with the Development Alternatives scientists, the temple priest and the local residents for plan of action to help revive the river.

No. of participants: 1500 across the country
No. of water bodies (including lakes and streams): 30
No. of samples/season/year: 80

The river is now called "Yuk" Yamuna, and we will work towards celebrating the river, said one student.

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Old Alwal

World Water Monitoring Day was celebrated by UFERWAS - ALWAL Circle - Education Cell on 18.9.08. This U.N. project initiative was the brain child of Wing Commander [Retd ]- Narasimha Rao Chilukuri, resident of Bhanu enclave Yapral. This project would not have been done so effectively without the total support of Shri D. Muralidhar Gupta, principal at Sri Datta Talent School, Suryanagar Colony, Old Alwal. Mr. Gupta arranged for the transport van and also provided the meditation hall of his school for introduction of the session.

UFERWAS - ALWAL Circle would also like to thank P.T. Teacher Shri Gabrielamma of the Zilla Parishad High School For Girls in Old Alwal; Mathematics Teacher Shri Shekar of the Zilla Parishad High School For Boys in Old Alwal; and Teacher Shri Srinivas of the Sri Datta Talent School.

This project created awareness amongst the children on saving the water bodies and also focused them more on environmental awareness. They performed the dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and temperature tests and were charged with acquainting other students in their respective schools with what they’d learned.  This was meant to be part of a cascading model of sharing knowledge where each of the 12 participating students would share knowledge with five other students in their class/school.

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Kolkata

The World Water Monitoring Day program was initiated with a special assembly on 18 September at Birla High School for Boys, Kolkata (Jr. Section). A PowerPoint presentation was made to acquaint children with key facts about water. Students have worked on projects on saving water.  They have been monitoring water pollution in a nearby pond which is used by the local people for bathing and other day to day use like washing taxis.

The students had participated in an EPA program where they researched and wrote journals on sources of water, pollutants, and water wastage in everyday life. They even became water auditors and kept a lookout for leaking taps in the school and neighbourhood.

The arrival of the Water Monitoring kit on November 20 was greeted with great excitement. Students were acquainted with the working of the kit. They set out eagerly on the morning of 6 December to collect water from River Hoogly a tributary of the Ganges. The group found people bathing, worshipping, offering flowers in the river. Boys collected the water and noted the temperature.

The temperature of the water sample was about four degrees less than the air temperature. Hoogly--the community's life line--held 2 ppm of dissolved oxygen. The pH of the water was 8.0. The turbidity level was 40.

This test results led to an interactive session wherein the group discussed reasons for the lack of oxygen and turbidity. There were many aquatic plants nearby, and the rotting flowers probably led to reduction in DO level.  Since this river provides the community's drinking water and water for everyday needs, citizens have to take care. Thus, the group has planned a poster campaign to make people aware of the dangers of polluting the Hoogly.

The next stop was Kamarhatty Company. Pupils visited the paper factory and collected water from the pond where the used water from the factory is collected. This factory is an example of how man can recycle . The raw material is waste cartons and paper that have been discarded as trash and water that is used for paper making is purified and reused. Water recycling was an exciting prospect for the pupils. The pond water yielded a pleasant surprise. The pH was a tolerable 7 to 8. The dissolved oxygen was 7ppm.

Water samples from Albert Park and Dhakuria lakes were also collected and tested. The entire process led to discussions on the need to keep water safe and clean for aquatic animals and plants, as well as human beings who need and use it.

The group has decided to keep a check on the water bodies during the different seasons to see the changes.

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Indonesia

The energetic yells of SMP 115 students were no indication of tiredness. They had just joined in a series of activities for World Water Monitoring Day, hosted by FORKAMI together with UNICEF, PT. Aetra, AMPL network and supported by Environment Engineering of Trisakti University and KTLH Sangga Buana.  The event was held Saturday, 22 December in Kali Pesanggrahan Forest Area, Lebak Bulus, Jakarta. 
 

Under the shady trees, the students--in small groups--checked basic parameters of water quality such as temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), acidity (pH), and turbidity by using water testing tools sponsored by the International Water Association. They also learned to observe river ecosystems such as benthic, small shrimps, worms, snails, and water grasshoppers using simple equipments.

Along with monitoring for WWMD, the event highlighted the International Year of Sanitation for 2008 and underscored the importance of basic sanitation for health reasons. Together with facilitators, students were performing a transect walk by identifying the disease contamination pattern around their houses. This activity is expected to raise the awareness of students to understand the relation between proper sanitation and quality of water. The next action was related to conserving water quantity and quality. Students planted trees in and around the area and spread fish seedlings. The other activity was to raise students' awareness of the need to protect their water catchment areas by tracking and introducing the indigenous flora and fauna in the region. Afterwards, they analyzed the information and drew conclusions about their findings during both activities.

Kali Pesanggrahan Forest has 40 hectares of area and it spreads for 40 km alongside Karang Tengah River, Lebak Bulus, South Jakarta. The forest is declared as protected forest in the southern part of Jakarta where clean air, big trees, flowing river waters, and songbirds are not just legends. 

In 2008, the commemoration of World Water Monitoring Day marked the fifth year since it was first held by FORKAMI in 2004. This year, almost 90 participants including students of SMP 115 Jakarta, FORKAMI members, and neighboring communities took part in this event, and it was covered by national media.

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Israel

Fifth-grade students from A.D.M School in Kibbutz Gaash Israel recently participated in World Water Monitoring Day by testing a "puddle" that had formed after a heavy rain. Water that collects in this way is used for irrigation. To view the students' report, click here.

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Latvia

It was a usual day in the life of Riga, Latvia. Everything seemed like it was going to be one of those routines which we normally have daily: the changeable autumn weather and people’s rush.

However, among the people there stood out a group of youngsters. They were the young water researchers from different Riga schools -- Riga State School, L. Tolstoy’s Secondary School, as well as 2 students from the University of Latvia guided by a teacher from Riga Nature School. Seven people altogether. Seven young people, who are not indifferent to the future destiny of our planet. They had already worked out their action plan and the route.

The first venue of investigation was the Riga Channel next to the building of Faculty of Biology, University of Latvia. For most of them it was not the first time when they were doing this kind of water monitoring, so the work went smoothly and the group moved on to the next venue. It was the Daugava River near the Railway Bridge. In fact, it was the most important part of their investigation, because the Daugava is the largest and longest river in this country. Unfortunately, it is also the most polluted among the largest rivers in Latvia. Therefore, it was inevitable to pay special attention to this part of the project.

Having collected the necessary amount of the water samples and having performed the planned investigation, the group finished their work that day. The task for this day was completed. The participants were pleased and nobody was sad because they knew they would soon get together again for more research. In the meantime, Riga Nature School was making new arrangements with other representatives from different schools around Latvia to implement project not only in Riga but all around the country.

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Lithuania

The event took place in Kaunas, Lithuania by the river Neris at 13:00 on November 25 and at Vydunas Secondary School on November 27. A group of 11 pupils and their English teacher Rasma Stuokiene attended the event. Later at school, pupils carried out experiments with their chemistry teacher Dalia Z. who explained the importance of dissolved oxygen and pH levels.

The Neris was chosen because it is the second biggest river in Lithuania, and it was really interesting to observe how much it is polluted after having flowed through Belorussia and our capital Vilnius. At this site we noticed that the turbidity was really low and the water seemed quite transparent. The pH was 7.5 and dissolved oxygen 8 ppm. Water temperature was 38°C.

In September, the pupils watched a powerpoint presentation about pollution and the importance of water in our everyday life. Thus the monitoring event was eagerly awaited by pupils, since they were already aware of its importance.

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Macedonia

On November 9, a team from the Jane Sandanski school in Strumica, Macedonia participated in a World Water Monitoring Day event organized by the school. The team tested the water from several sites within its municipality using the WWMD test kit. We used the WWMD test kit. Though the team had only one test kit, the teamwork aspect was excellent. The group was comprised of 11 students and three professors. The group assessed a few samples from each site to ensure that the results were consistent and correct. The results from each set were averaged and reported to the WWMD program as follows:

 

 

Turbidity 

Temp 

DO 

pH 

Ladna Voda #1

0

12

4

8

Ladna Voda #2

0

12

4

7

Sv. Nedela Spring

0

12

4

7

River Ciflik

40

10

4

7

River Vodocnica

0

10

8

8

River Trakajna

0

14

8

7

Lake Turija

0

16

4

8

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Malaysia

Kedah

The launch of WWMD ’08 in Malaysia took place at Teloi Kanan Secondary School (Kuala Ketil, Kedah, Malaysia) on September 18.  The event was attended by some 700 school children from 40 pilot schools of the One State One River project, as well as officials from the State and District Education Department and Irrigation and Drainage Department of Kedah.

An additional 250 students and teachers participated in monitoring activities at a special three-day river camp, which was organized from October 16 to 18. Another three camps were organized throughout the state in the following weeks. Some 30 Boy Scout groups also monitored in Malaysia this year with more than two thousand scouts participating.

A small closing ceremony, attended by 40 students of Teloi Kanan, was held on December 18.  By this time, some 12 thousand students from ENO (Environment Online) clubs, school nature clubs, River Rangers and Boy Scouts had taken part in the Malaysian WWMD campaign.

For 2009, coordinators in Malaysia project that approximately 50 thousand of the country’s students will take part, and that by 2010 some 100 thousand students will participate in an international WWMD event.

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Kuching

The WWMD 2008 project in Kuching, Sarawak was jointly organized by the Malaysia Institute of Chemistry and the Rotary Club of Kuching. The participants, totaling about 150, from the Interact Clubs of six secondary schools in Kuching and the Rotaract Club of Kuching were selected. The event was officially launched at the Waterfront of Kuching by the Chairman of the Malaysia Institute of Chemistry (Sarawak Branch), Mr. Chan Woon Peng and the President of the Rotary Club of Kuching, Prof. Dr. Lau Seng.

WWMD T-shirts were distributed to all participants and each club was given a certificate of participation. Each monitoring team was supervised by a chemist, Rotarian Advisor and a teacher. The chemists also gave talks on water quality and water pollution to all the participating schools. Eight sites around Kuching, the capital city of Sarawak in Borneo were selected based on the surrounding land uses and the accessibility and locality of the sites.

The Interact Club of St Thomas School monitored the water quality at Stutong River which drains through several residential areas. The Interact Club of Lodge International Secondary School has selected two sites. The first site was at the Tabuan River, which is a tidal stream/creek that receives discharges from residential homes, the wet market and some commercial establishments such as food stall. The second site was at a stream that runs through a nature park and receives discharges from a small residential estate. The students found the exercise very rewarding and their awareness on the importance of good water quality has increased.

The Interact Club of St. Joseph School monitored the Sarawak River at the Batu Kawa Bridge. This site is located at the perimeter of the city. It represented the river before entering the city. Land uses upstream of this site are mainly vegetable farming and oil palm plantations with many villages within the watershed area.

The Rotaract Club of Kuching monitored the Sarawak River at the city centre, which is called the Kuching Waterfront.  There are floating jetties at this part for passenger boats as well as river cruise.

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Pahang, Kedah, Negeri Sembilan, Melaka, Johor

The Malaysian Water Association (MWA) collaborated with utility companies and water supply organizations in the World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) activities held from October 21 to November 5.  This year, WWMD was organized in five states - Pahang (October 21), Kedah (October 26), Negeri Sembilan (October 29), Melaka (November 4), and Johor (November 13). 


This national event kicked off in Pahang where it was launched by Datuk Mohd Soffi Tan Sri Razak, Pahang State Executive Council for Basic Amenities, Transport and Housing.  One hundred and twenty students from five schools in Pahang participated in WWMD.  The schools were SK Sg. Lembing, SK Sg. Mas, SK Nadak, SKJ (C) Sg. Lembing and SKJ (C) Panching.  The children performed tests for dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity (clarity) and temperature on the water collected from Sungai Pahang. 

 

The second leg of WWMD was held in Kedah where 40 students from SK Khir Johari collected and tested water sample from Sungai Petani.  In Negeri Sembilan, 40 students from SK Ampangan took part in the event.  In Melaka, WWMD was held at Dataran Pahlawan where 40 students from SK Bandar Hilir participated. 
 

The final leg of WWMD was held in Kota Tinggi Johor where the closing ceremony was done by Y.B. Tan Kok Hong, Chairman, Johor International Trade and Industry, Energy, Water and Communications, and Environment Committee. One hundred and twenty students from five schools took part in WWMD, and the schools were SRJKC New Kota, SRK Sri Saujana, SRK Bukit Lintang, SRK Tamil Jalan Tajul and SK Taman Suria. 

To accomplish the water testing, facilitators from participating organizations (Ranhill Utilities, Pahang Waterworks Department, Salcon, Kedah Waterworks Department and Malacca Water Company) were on-hand to help test the waters and to explain to the students the level of the water quality based on the results collected.  

While engaged in this annual event, students can learn more about the waterbody; how waterbodies contribute to the whole ecosystem and how, by protecting it, humankind can continuously enjoy a quality supply of water.

MWA collaborated with Ranhill Utilities to organize WWMD in Pahang, Kedah, Melaka and Johor, and with Salcon in Negeri Sembilan.

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Mexico

Mexico City

On the occasion of World Water Monitoring Day, the office of Mexico City, hosted a breakfast for representatives of the countries of Northern Latin America and various Mexican authorities relating to the treatment and distribution of water. The event took place at an elegant restaurant at the Lake of Chapultepec, historical site where the Emperor Moctezuma bathrooms were located in the fifteenth century.

Present were the Ambassadors of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador, Peru, Dominican Republic and Jamaica, also attended representatives of the President Office, executives of the National Water Commission, Mexico City Government officials and representatives of private companies such as DuPont, Pemex.

From CH2M HILL, Gene Lupia President of Environmental Services, Jennifer Writney, Carlos Pereyra from Buenos Aires office, and the project leaders of Mexico’s Office, attended.

To all of them were explained in detail the procedures for carrying out the test and subsequent registration on the website, that focus the global results, emphasized the need to inculcate in children the culture of caring for the water. Mexico City office team has registered many local sites where the test will be done; these sites are Universities Campus, Schools, condominiums, corporate buildings and other water sites like rural water wells and rural irrigation districts.

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Mexico City

On December 18, Paola Martínez and Daniel Estrada visited Río Chico de los Remedios, one of the 84 river-sewages in Mexico City. Most of the valley’s rivers are polluted right at the beginning. One dozen have some pollution reduced miles before joining the black waters. Finally all of the rivers-sewages are pumped out of the Valley into the Moctezuma’s River that continues its course into the Gulf of Mexico.

Río Chico de los Remedios has crystal waters for 20 miles before it enters the suburbs. The first test was done four miles after that. A second test was done at the beginning of the affluent-sewage that joins the river half a mile after the first testing point.

The water quality at these sites is quite poor. That’s the shared reality of the rivers of the most populated city in the continent (America). Less than a century ago, all of those rivers had clean water and ended up at a huge lake. Nowadays all of them end up polluted at the ocean. The water story of this megalopolis has been changed dramatically by its inhabitants and could change for good if citizens pay attention to what water says. Paola and Daniel took the first step: collect data. Hopefully this will result in further involvement with the goal of returning life to rivers.

 

 

Turbidity 

Temp 

DO 

pH 

Benthos 

Chichipica

100

13

4

7

Syrphidae & Nematode

La Culebra

100

14

4

6.5

Nematode

Chico de los Remedios

100

14

4

7

None Seen

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Nepal

Kathmandu

On November 20, Mr. Hukum Raj Baral, Head of the Department of Science, of Nobel Academy H.S. School Kathmandu, Nepal, along with 30 students from Grade 9 carried out the water monitoring activities. The activities were coordinated by Mr. Nawaraj Baskota, the vice principal of the academy.

The team chose several sites of the Bagmati River which flows by the Pashupati Nath Temple--a world heritage site and a holy place of the Hindus. The site is culturally important as cremation is carried out on the bank of the river by the Hindus.

During monitoring, the instructions were followed and the kits provided by WWMD were utilized. The team was interested in contributing to the international WWMD program. Results of ten different samples were averaged and reported to the WWMD program as follows:

 

 

Turbidity 

Temp 

DO 

pH 

Bagmati River

40

16

4

7

 

The team plans to continue the study on ecological status of rapidly urbanized valley of Kathmandu.

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Kathmandu

On the occasion of World Water Monitoring Day, Hindu Kush Himalayan Benthological Society (HKH BENSO) organized a month long (17th Sep. 2008 to 16th Oct. 2008) monitoring program with the objective of promoting public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world.

Mr. Deep Narayan Shah, M.Sc (Aquatic Ecologist), presented a lecture about water monitoring to the team members. He emphasized the importance of clean water, not only for the citizens of Kathmandu but also to support healthy aquatic life systems which are sensitive to polluted water. Altogether 12 Environmental Science students participated in this event. The monitoring was conducted in Bagmati River system within Kathmandu Valley at different river stretches and in the Taudaha Lake in above 40 sites. This river system was selected by the team because Bagmati river together with its tributaries is the main source of water for domestic, irrigation and industrial uses for more than 2.5 million people of the Kathamndu valley. It is also a river of high religious significance of Nepal. Water quality monitoring was done through onsite and laboratory physicochemical analysis. The WWMD kit granted to the team by the WWMD program were also used.

The river stretches with clean water were found in the upstream part of the rivers/streams which are mostly covered with dense, protected forest and not easily accessible to human beings. The river water quality deteriorates rapidly as the river pass through semi urban and urban areas. The stressing factors for degradation of the Bagmati river basin was identified and categorized as domestic and industrial effluents, solid waste disposal, washing/bathing and substrate abstraction.

This event created awareness amongst the students on saving the water bodies and also focused them more on environmental awareness. We all agreed that more teams need to be formed to check the parameters of the Bagmati River and its tributaries at regular intervals.

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Pakistan

On November 9, 2008, Mr. Rangeen Khan along with his friends (Mr. Ayaz, Mr. Fali Rabi, Mr. Abdur Rehman, and Mr. Amjad) carried out the water monitoring activities by choosing a stream in Saleem Khan, a small village three kilometers north of Swabi, Pakistan. During monitoring, the instructions were followed, and the kits provided by WEF were utilized. The activity was coordinated by Mr. Khan (MBA), WES Coordinator SMU Swabi, who also selected the testing site. The group was excited to contribute to the international WWMD program.

The stream of Saleem Khan flows from North to West and merges with River Indus near to the motorway, eventually joining the Arabian Sea at Karachi. Tests were conducted and the results are as follows:

 

 

Site 1 

Date

November 9, 2008

Place

Stream Saleem Khan, Swabi

Air Temperature

22  C

Water temperature

22  C

Oxygen Dissolved

4 PPM

PH

7

Turbidity

40  JTU

 

The team plans to continue evaluating other streams and rivers and will plan some interventions in the community.

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Philippines

For the first time in South Central Mindanao region in the Philippines, 60 pupils from three public elementary schools trooped to three bodies of water for quality sampling and testing on October 14 and 15, 2008. 

Mobilized by the South Central Mindanao Program Office of Save the Children and with the test kits provided by the World Water Monitoring Day, the pupils joined the global community in conducting basic monitoring of their local bodies of water to build public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world. The bodies of water examined on separate occasions are as follows:

El Lahak Spring situated in Barangay Lamlahak, Lake Sebu, South Cotabato – the smallest lake in the municipality of Lake Sebu located in the middle of Allah Valley Watershed Forest Reserve. El Lahak Spring serves as the main source of potable water for the community.

Lake Lahit in Barangay Lake Lahit, Lake Sebu, South Cotabato – serves as a sanctuary for freshwater shrimps and snails and is being used for fish farming (e.g. Tilapia culture) and duck-raising.

Macuag River – a tributary of Allah River, a huge river that bounds South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat and Maguindanao provinces and flows to Liguasan Marsh, one of the biggest water basins in Mindanao Island. Macaug River is being used as a recreation site of schoolchildren and community residents of Barangay Tuka, Bagumbayan and a source of irrigation to about 500 hectares of rice fields.

Guided by Save the Children staff and partners from the Department of Education Divisions of South Cotabato and Sultan Kudarat , the Rural Health Units of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato and Bagumbayan, Sultan Kudarat and the teachers of the respective schools, the participating schools with 20 pupils each were:

    • Lamlahak Elementary School in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato
    • Lake Lahit Elementary School in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato
    • Tuka Elementary School in Bagumbayan, Sultan Kudarat

The test results for the Macuag River showed that there is already a certain level of chemical contamination and pollution present. The results for Lake Lahit and El Lahak Spring were better, showing that the water was free from micro-organisms.

Some of the actions proposed as follow-ups by the participants include:  sharing the test results with other students and villagers, constructing a reservoir that could help protect Lahak Spring from contamination, proposing a strong waste management plan and clean-up measures to prevent the escalation of damages to the Macuag River, and advocating for fewer fish cages in Lake Lahit.

Given the results of the activity, the pupils together with the school administrators will continue to advocate to the whole community the value of environmental protection through continuous tree planting and proper waste management.  The event will also be highlighted and shared with the local government officials and policy makers to strengthen local plans and agenda concerning environmental conservation.

In general, the activity was a success and memorable, particularly to all the children who gained a deeper sense of understanding and appreciation of the value of water and the environment as a whole.  It also motivated them to act as the lead in promoting to their fellow pupils the importance of water as a fundamental element of daily living.

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Poland

Animex Group organized WWMD on September 18th 2008 in 8 towns where Animex plants are located. The goal was to examine the water quality in nearby rivers, reservoirs and lakes.

The event started at 9:00 a.m. in some locations and at 11:00 a.m. in others.  It continued for 2-4 hours. The number of participants in each place ranged from 31 to 75. The amount of attendants in all sites totaled 299, consisting mainly of 14-17 year old students. The figures per site are given below:

Dębica - 34 students,
Suwałki - 35 students;
Starachowice - 31 students;
Iława - 29 students;
Ełk - 31 students;
Opole - 30 students;
Szczecin - 37 students;
Ostróda - 75 students.

The students, mostly from secondary schools, were supervised by their teachers and the representatives of Animex facilities responsible for technical and marketing departments. In addition to the students, numerous observers, supervisors, local authority officials and Animex representatives attended the events.
 

At the opening the General and Technical Managers of Animex facilities welcomed all guests: head-masters, city mayors, borough mayors, representatives of the Environment Protection Inspection, local governments, ecological foundations, and the students.

Next, Animex reps explained the idea of the World Water Monitoring Day, the role of Smithfield Foods and Animex Group and its facilities in preserving water and its natural environment.

Animex specialists at each site instructed the students in the subjects of water monitoring and environment protection. The students took samples of water and inspected them under supervision of laboratory specialists.  Each participant drew up a test report. The students were pleased that they had a chance to examine the water quality themselves.

The students learned about environment protection and took part in an ecological quiz. Animex sponsored awards for the winners, as well as gifts and certificates with a logo of the event (info about each facility, Animex Group and WWMD) for each participant.

At the end Animex invited all participants to a hot snack and drinks.

Results  by ANIMEX  Group :

 

City

T water
° C

pH

DO %

Turbidity JTU

Dębica

10

8

35

40

Suwałki

8

7,5

39

0

Starachowice

9,1

7,5

37,3

0

Iława

14

8

39

40

Ełk

15,8

7,8

41

0

Opole

10

7,7

35

0

Szczecin

11,5

8

37

0

Ostroda

16

6

42

0

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Portugal

Within the contents of the ENO Programme online, we decided to develop an activity that was suggested and which goal was: to learn how to monitor water quality in a nearby river.

In the school proximity, there is a creek called Ribeira Verde, and it flows along a forest near the school. In the hot days of summer, our students usually go there to bathe. So, we found it important to get to know the water quality in order to advise our students of pollution awareness.

The teachers gathered a small group of students one morning, and they walked to the creek. Once there, they analyzed the water turbidity, the pH, the oxygen and the temperature. Then, with the figures registered, they concluded that the water was safe to swim because it was very clean.

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Romania

Calarasi

On November 23, students from Barbu Stirbei College Calarasi, grade 9D participated in an interesting experience of water quality monitoring - World Water Monitoring Day. Situated in the South-Eastern part of the Romanian Plain, along the Danube River and its Borcea Branch is the Calarasi County with the capital city at Călăraşi.

The participating students carried out monitoring using the WWMD kit. Water sampling locations were selected along Borcea River, near Calarasi (Central Park). Samplings were taken from riverbanks. There were ten students in two groups guided by two facilitators (Marinela Dinca and Monica Dumitru). The test kit allowed testing for a core set of water quality parameters such as temperature, pH, water clarity and dissolved oxygen.

"It was a great opportunity for our students to be part of World Water Monitoring Day and speak about their environmental accomplishments," said Biology teacher Marinela Dinca. "Students need to understand the importance of water quality because it is time to re-examine our values, make thoughtful choices and adjust our lifestyles to give more consideration to the environment. This includes changing our water use habits in ways that will help the resource sustain itself and maintain its quality."

Click here to see a photo collage.

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Constantza

Four 11th-grade students from High School Decebal conducted a monitoring project on the banks of the Tabacarie Lake. Water samples were taken from three different places, and the results weren’t as good as the group expected. Chemistry teacher Ms. Cornelia Serban prepared and gave the students all the equipment needed to perform the tests. The experiment was done on November 11 at 9:30 AM. The water was visibly dirty. The group found the following results:

- air temperature : 180 C
- water temperature: 160C
- oxygen dissolved : 8 PPM
- PH :10
- turbidity : 40 JTU

The students will continue doing this kind of experiment until they can see no further pollution or dirt in the waters, and they advise others to do the same. "It’s our world we live in, it’s our responsibility," said one student. "More and more students should be initiated in such projects, and even adults, because we need to prove that we care and that we... will never give up on our world."

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Corocaiesti Village

A WWMD event was held in Corocaiesti Village (Northern Romania) near the Siret River on Tuesday, 28 October 2008. Ten teachers and students from the Secondary School Corocaiesti attended the event. The group collected many water sample from the main waterbody and used the WWMD test kit. This Siret was selected for monitoring because it is the main source of water in the area. Both teachers and students were happy to test this water for their community.

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Dobrogea Keys

On  October 23, a group of 14 students and their teacher Miss Doina Munteanu celebrated WWMD at Casimcea River in Dobrogea Keys. They took six samples from different parts of the river.  During monitoring, the instructions were followed, and the kits provided by the WWMD program were used.

They chose the Casimcea River because it is the most important river near Constanta and because it is important for agriculture from the surrounding area. Unfortunately, the students found much trash in and near the river and because of that, the water looked polluted. They challenged the authorities to do something about this problem.

After two weeks, the same group made another trip to Casimcea River, and they were very excited to find that there wasn’t as much trash as the first time. They were very happy because they could help prevent the pollution.

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Galati

Water has no taste, no color, no odor; it cannot be defined, art relished while ever mysterious. Not necessary to life, but rather life itself. It fills us with a gratification that exceeds the delight of the senses. 

ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPERY (1900-1944), Wind, Sand, and Stars, 1939

A group of seventh grade students accompanied by Ms. Georgiana Munteanu, the teacher responsible for European projects, left school on 25 November—a beautiful autumn day—and headed for the Danube. The river is quite near their school, School 2 Galati, so that in about fifteen minutes they reached the bank. The Danube is the second biggest river in Europe, and the city of Galati is 160 km from its flow into the Black Sea, forming the richest and wildest delta on the continent.

Water samples were taken from three different places along the Danube bank, all in the city area. Lacking special test kits, the experiments and the measurements were done at school in the chemistry laboratory. Ms. Viorica Cortojan, the chemistry teacher, prepared all the equipment necessary to analyze the different water samples. The students could determine some characteristics of the water such as temperature, clarity, color, smell, pH, ions of chlorine and sulphur.

The results of the experiment proved that the Danube water contains small quantities of ions of sulphur and chlorine; the pH is between 6.5 and 8; and the clarity is at average level. Due to this activity, the students could demonstrate that the water of the Danube is not polluted or (at least) it is under the suspicion level.

Very encouraging and appreciated by the teachers was the students' enthusiasm and their desire to be engaged in further activities for the environment. Everybody agreed that more teams need to be formed to check the parameters of the Danube at regular intervals.

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Hunedoara County

Scoala Generala Petros-Baru, located in a village in Hunedoara County, participated in the World Water Monitoring project from November to December. 80 students participated in this event, collecting 100 samples from four different bodies of water: the Barisor River, Strei River, Muncel River and Crivedia River.

The surrounding areas of the rivers are mainly agricultural. While the water is mostly clean and clear, conditions that were noted were "dirty" water and trash, which had been thrown in the rivers or on the ground. Throughout the month of the sample collections, the outside temperatures ranged from 3°C to 18°C, and the water temperatures ranged from 1°C to 13°C. The pH levels of all the waterbodies ranged from 4 to 10, and turbidity ranged from 0 JTU to 100 JTU. The sites where samples were collected were selected because they are the main bodies of water in the area. Also, they were chosen so that students could have hands-on experience in learning and seeing how their water is polluted by the community’s inhabitants and the local factory.

All students were glad to be able to partake in this project. They said that it was very nice to be able to go out into their village and learn about pollution and actually see what was happening with their water. The adults, including Ms. Ana Tecau, the English teacher, and Ms. Sara Renals, a Peace Corps volunteer, who participated in the project also enjoyed learning about the surrounding environment and how pollution can have an impact on water resources. 

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Moreni

It was a sunny October 13 when 15 students from the Environmental protection classes, from Grupul Scolar Industrial Petrol Moreni, Dambovita, Romania, went to monitor the quality of the water that crosses their town, Crivovul Dulce, at the ending point of its cross from the town.

Using the WWMD test kits, they collected several samples of water and analyzed them, obtaining the same results. After four days, they went to test again the water, using the same number of the samples like in the first day, but this time at the entering point into the town; after that they compared the results. In both days the weather was nice, the sun shining. They didn’t obtain big differences in the results--just the value of DO was different due to the pollution.

The students are aware of the importance of clean water, so they are determined to fight against the pollution, initiating a campaign with the aim to persuade the inhabitants of their town about the necessity of having clean and fresh waters.

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Timisoara

Smithfield Ferme, a subsidiary of Smithfield Foods, Inc., hosted World Water Monitoring Day activities in Timisoara on October 16. On the shores of the Bega River, eighth-grade students from William Shakespeare High School conducted basic water quality tests, assisted by their teachers and Smithfield Ferme employees. “The water from Bega is not too clean, as I can see. I did not see how it is tested before now," said Elena Sinoi, a pupil in the eighth grade E3. Representatives of local authorities, media outlets, water quality experts, and parents also attended the event.

Smithfield Foods, Inc. has invested over EUR 30 million so far in non-polluting technology and, together with the Pedological and Agrochemical Studies Office, it continuously monitors the quality of waters in the areas where it owns production units.

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Singapore

Tertiary students from Nanyang Technological University (NTU) participated in World Water Monitoring Day hosted by CH2M HILL this October. They gained first-hand experience in assessing the health of their local watershed and learned more about the technical aspects of designing a blue and green network via conversion of existing concrete canals into aesthetic and clean waterways for residents and users.


Students were given a tour and conducted testing of the Kallang River (Kolam Ayer ABC Waterfront), the first completed project from the Active, Beautiful and Clean (ABC) Waters Programme by PUB, Singapore’s national water agency. Conducted personally by Mr. Tan Ngo Chiaw, the Managing Director of CH2M HILL Singapore, students were given first-hand information and tryouts on the various elements such as water play sculptures — Archimedes Screw, Waterwheel, Hand Weirs, a floating deck that extends out into the river — as well as learning about cleansing biotopes.

The second half of the morning was spent back in NTU where Project Manager Mr. Lee Tuck Wai gave a presentation on “Stormwater Management Best Management Practices”. Students were then separated into smaller groups to discuss the question “How can we incorporate Sustainable Stormwater Management design in Singapore?”

Overall feedback for the program was positive, "I think this site visit is very meaningful, because I learnt a lot about practical things. And I feel so good to get close to nature; surely I will participate in more site visits in the future," said student Lai Chuen Hien.

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Spain

ADECAGUA, a WWMD Partner and WEF Member Association, organized El Día Mundial del Control de la Calidad del Agua (World Water Monitoring Day) for the second year thanks to the economic and technical help of the Ministerio del Medio Ambiente, Medio Rural Rural y Marino.

In addition to the four indicators usually tested for WWMD, ADECAGUA has added tests for nitrates, hardness and benthos, as well as habitat assessments (vegetation) to its program.

Since September 18, ADECAGUA has provided 600 WWMD kits to its collaborators, who represent more than 7,000 participants throughout Spain and four Spanish-speaking countries in South America that also asked to participate. These participants include 68 schools, 55 associations, 26 environmental education centers, 11 town halls, eight universties and 110 individuals.

Hundred of places are being monitored in Spain, and ADECAGUA looks forward to reaching some 2000 sampling points in 2008. The association hopes that this experience will be the basis to produce new feelings in Spain about water quality and contribute to citizens' water quality knowledge.

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Sudan

A group of Sudanese students conducted monitoring activities in October. Water samples from three rivers were collected (one sample each). The waterbodies were the Blue Nile, the White Nile, and the River Nile. The White Nile sample was taken from the upstream side of the dam. The river was very wide, clear and flowed quietly. At the Blue Nile, the water flowed very fast was dark and silty. The River Nile sample was taken from an agricultural area, far from the residential area. Click here to read the group's report.

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Swaziland

Ngomane High School is in the east of the kingdom of Swaziland in Africa. Water testing was done over two days on October 22 and 23. The waterbodies first tested were Manzempunga, Black Mbuluzi, Lusushwana and Mbuluzana streams. These water bodies are found in Simunye and Manzini. The idea was to test water in different environmental conditions such as agricultural and industrial.

The event was attended by about 300 pupils and teachers. The day started with traditional dances to spice the day and lectures to students on the general importance of water and the importance of the water testing exercise. After that, the group watched the instructional DVD provided by the World Water Monitoring Day program. The activity was very educative to the students and teachers who resolved to test the water twice a year to compare the results. Most of the sites had cloudy water but water was running well.

Ngomane High School wishes to thank the school adminstration for sponsoring transport to go to these sites, the World Water Monitoring Day program for donating the test kits that enabled all 300 students to test, ENO (Environment Online) for the encouragement and Ms. Lieke Van Hoven for her effort in making sure that the kits were received.

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Taiwan

The students of National Fenghsin Senior High School in Kaohsiung, Taiwan cooperated with the National Science and Technology Museum in order to participate in WWMD '08. The group monitored the Love River on November 22 and invited Professor Yie from National Kaohsiung Normal University to give a lecture on Water Usage in Kaohsiung. Though the government has spent a lot of money on cleaning up the river, the data collected demonstrated that there is room for improvement.

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Thailand

On Friday, 17 October, SLP Environmental sponsored a World Water Monitoring Day event on the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand with the objective of promoting public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources around the world.

Liz Pearmain, an Environmental Consultant and Director at SLP Environmental based in South East Asia, co-organised and sponsored the event with Green Networking Days, a networking group that meets on a monthly basis with the aim of bringing together individuals and businesses interested in issues related to the environment. The water monitoring event was held along the lower reach of the Chao Phraya River running through Bangkok, aboard the Prem Centre Magic Eyes Barge, an educational classroom and floating laboratory housed upon a converted rice barge.

Thirty members of Green Networking Days, with assistance from experienced water monitoring volunteers from both SLP Environmental and the Prem Centre Magic Eyes Barge performed water monitoring tests on water samples for dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity (clarity), and temperature (the four parameters required by the Water Monitoring Day program).  The water monitoring was undertaken at two locations along the Chao Phraya River. The first sampling location was upstream in the centre of the Chao Phraya River near the Rama VIII Bridge and the second was downstream at Wat Dao Khanong Pier, Thonburi where Dao Khanong Klong (Canal) joins the Chao Phraya River. 
 

The results indicated a slight deterioration in water quality between the two monitoring locations and this is considered to reflect the fact that Klong Dao Khanong discharges waters with a higher level of organic and suspended solids into the Chao Phraya River at this location. Speakers at the event also gave participants an overview of the significance of the Chao Phraya River and its watersheds to Thailand. They also explored the environmental issues associated with the degradation of water quality in the river as a result of anthropogenic activities. In addition, participants discussed the benefits of adopting a more environmentally friendly and ecologically sustainable way of life.

The Chao Phraya River Basin covers approximately 35% of Thailand’s land mass, rises in the mountains of Doi Inthanon National Park in north west Thailand near Chiang Mai and runs for 1,085 kilometers before entering the Gulf of Thailand in Samut Prakarn Province. The Chao Phraya watershed contains several large rivers, including the Ping, Wang, Yom, and Nan, and it also includes many smaller rivers such as the Tha Chin, Pasak and Lopburi.

Much of Thai history can be traced along the banks of the Chao Phraya River and today the Chao Phraya River remains the most important waterway for the people of central Thailand as a source of water for domestic use, agriculture, industry, transport, religious festivals and leisure.  Feedback from the day was extremely positive and all agreed that it is critical that a holistic management plan for the Chao Phraya River and its Basin is formulated and implemented in order that future generations of Thais can continue to enjoy the enormous benefits this vital watercourse bestows upon the Country.

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Trinidad and Tobago

Tobago

As part of Tobago’s campaign to promote clean water, Barry Lovelace (Education and Outreach Coordinator, Buccoo Reef Trust (BRT)) and Jan-Willem van Bochove (Chief Technical Advisor, Coral Cay Conservation (CCC)) were invited to Channel 5’s ‘Rise & Shine’ television program to share their views on the importance of clean water to the health of Tobago’s people and its natural resources. The guests emphasized the importance of clean water, not only for the citizens of Tobago but also to support healthy coral reef systems which are sensitive to polluted and dirty water runoff.
 

The one-hour program presented a valuable opportunity for WWMD to reach a wider audience and stimulate local community groups and schools to get actively involved in the educational and scholarship programs BRT and CCC run. The BRT has been actively involved in this program for several years, providing local schools with monitoring kits kindly donated by the WWMD organizers.
 

The BRT also organized and held several field trips on the 19th and 26th September for high school students from Tobago as part of awareness raising for WWMD. Students were firstly taken to inland water catchments before heading down to Buccoo Beach. They were given on-site lectures from BRT staff (Hyacinth Armstrong and Barry Lovelace) covering water catchment management and the role mangroves play in sediment trapping. Clint Cameron (Project Scientist) from CCC complemented these lectures with a talk on the effects of land based pollution and water runoff on coral reef health. Students were then taken on a glass bottom boat tour of Buccoo Reef Marine Park, which enabled them to see the progression of ecosystems from mangrove forests through to seagrass beds and coral reefs.
 

The BRT and CCC would like to thank the WWMD organizers for providing water monitoring sampling kits.

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Lopinot Village, Trinidad

On Monday, November 5, monitoring activities were carried out by IEARN students and teachers of the El Dorado Secondary Comprehensive School.

The Lopinot river has its source in the Eastern region of the Northern Range of mountains.  Five sites along the upper course of the river were chosen.  The group traveled the eight mile journey from Arouca by Touring bus, through the winding mountain valley road of pristine forest vegetation to arrive at the Lopinot village.  All the sites were at locations with easy access from the main road, within the boundary of  the village.  At each site there were few houses and numerous trees and vegetation. 

The day was bright and sunny and at approximately 10:00 am, when the first test was carried out, the atmospheric temperature was 28 degrees Celsius.  However, the temperature rose to 32 degrees by the time the last test occurred some three hours later.

All of the testing were done by students in groups of 5, with each member having a specific role to play.  At the end of the exercise the data from each group was examined and compiled in the following table.

 

 

Turbidity 

Temp 

DO 

pH 

Site 1

0

25°C

4

7

Site 2

0

25°C

4

8

Site 3

0

26°C

4

8

Site 4

0

27°C

4

7

Site 5

0

27°C

4

8

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Turkey

Izmir

İzmir Özel Çamlaraltı Kolejı (a private primary and secondary school in Izmir, Turkey) took part in the World Water Monitoring Day by analyzing water samples taken from 2 water resources. On October 17 2008 a group of students fom the 8th and 9th grades (14-15 year olds) accompanied by Mrs Ülkü Gürsoy (Project Coordinator)and 2 of their science teachers,Mrs. Ilkay Aydemir and Mr. Tayfun Büyüközlu set out to take the first water sample using the kit provided by this programme. The first samples were taken from ‘Balçova Stream ‘ a stream situated within the city limits. This stream was specifically chosen for this fact.. At the time the samples were taken Izmir had and still was going through one of its worst drought periods seen for many years. Therefore probably reflecting the results that were reached.

 

Site 1

Results

Date

17/10/2008

River’s Name /Place

Balçova Stream -Balçova/Izmir  Turkey 

Turbidity

40 JTU

DissolvedOxygen

50% = 4ppm

Ph

7

Temperature

27°C

 

The results showed that the values found in the samples taken from Balçova Stream show that the water is not fit for human consumption or in fact for any other use .eg. watering the garden. For this water to be used in other areas it has to be purified. The results showed that there is enough oxygen for living organisms
As mentioned above the found values could be due to the fact that there hasn’t been sufficient  rainfall in the previous winter and spring months.

On November 7 2008 the same group of students and teachers went to a village called  Payamlı, situated in the hills of Guzelbahçe 45 km from the centre of Izmir, to take a second lot of samples from the Çamli Brook . The Çamli Brook was chosen specifically for the fact that it was outside the city, away from a densely populated area and from factories and their waste.

 

Site 2

Results

Date

07/11/2008

River’s Name /Place

Çamli Brook /Guzelbahce,Izmir  Turkey 

Turbidity

0 JTU

DissolvedOxygen

80% = 8ppm

Ph

7

Temperature

15°C

 

This time the results showed  that the water can be used for everything BUT drinking . The level of oxygen was found to be high and the level of foreign substances was found to be low therefore enhancing the quality of the water. The reason for the high quality of water from this brook could be put down to the fact that it is situated outside of the city away from pollutants and waste.

The teachers and students were hoping to be able to take more samples from different brooks and streams but due to the drought many brooks and streams have dried up or do not produce enough water to do reliable tests.

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Soke-Aydin

The event was held in Soke-Aydin-Turkey in the December 16th. The Meander river (Buyuk Menderes Nehri) was chosen to investigate. The river Meander is well-known for its many curves. It is the longest river in Western Aegian Region. It’s 584 km long. The alluvial plain was famous for its fertility.

To estimate water quality of the Meander River, physical (turbidity, water temperature, Dissolved Oxygen and ph) parameters were investigated. According to our results the ph is 7 – 8, Dissolved oxygen is 6 – 9. It was also observed that Meander River is face to both pollution and to become dry. For this research 16 students from Bati Soke Cimento Primary School worked on it. Water samples brought to the school and students used the test kits and recorded the results.

Joining the monitoring day was useful and important for the students. They did experiments using their kits and beware of the pollution of river.

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United Arab Emirates

In September 2008, Ubah Mohamud, laboratory Health Science Technician, was searching the web for materials to use in the Water Analysis and Supply course practicals for the Food Inspection, Diploma Foundation students of The Higher Colleges of Technology at Al-Ain Men’s College, Al-Ain. She came across the World Water Monitoring Day website and thought it would be a good opportunity for the students to incorporate the WWMD programme into their Water Analysis and Supply course.

Ubah discussed this with Bill Jones, the course teacher, who thought it was a great idea as he had been involved with a similar programme in Western Australia (Ribbons of Blue). Bill explained the WWMD programme to his students who enthusiastically embraced the idea. They had studied the environment and ecology during previous semesters and now would be doing something positive to monitor their environment. They would also be the first group in the United Arab Emirates to participate in this programme.

After it was decided to take part in the WWMD programme a water testing kit was purchased from the WWMD organizers in the USA. This arrived at the end of October. The National Drilling Company – U.S. Geological Survey office in Al Ain, UAE, kindly donated four additional kits. Dr. Jeff. Imes, Hydrology Advisor and Dave Clark, Programme Advisor, USGS Al Ain, accompanied the group when they tested three sites in the Al Ain area. Click here to read the team's full report.

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United States

Alaska

More than 200 people participated in WWMD events in Alaska thanks to a partnership with the State of Alaska’s Department of Environmental Conservation and watershed groups in the state’s three largest cities.

In the capital city, Juneau, DEC and Juneau Watershed Partnership members took 50 sixth graders from Dzantik’l  Heeni  Middle School to conduct water quality monitoring at Switzer Creek.

More than 900 miles north in Fairbanks members from DEC, Tanana Valley Watershed Association, and Secondary Education majors (student teachers) from the University of Alaska Fairbanks set up a water carnival with games and testing stations on the Tanana River.  Games included a “pH Toss” where kids threw balls into buckets and won a prize if they made it in a bucket with a healthy pH, a water equivalence activity that demonstrated how much water is in the world compared to how much groundwater and how much freshwater, and a “go fish” game where kids would fish with a magnetic pole and would bring up sick or dying fish with the reason they are sick—kids would keep fishing until they get a healthy one and get a prize.

In Anchorage, members from the Anchorage Waterways Council and DEC set up a testing station at Chester Creek and had buckets of water from the city’s two other major creeks available for testing.

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Arizona

Phoenix

Rio Salado Habitat in central Phoenix, Arizona celebrated its first community World Water Festival this October. The habitat was teeming with over 400 participants. Many visited with Larry Wilson, and collaborated on a mural under the Central Ave Bridge celebrating World Water Day. Magic H2O wowed audiences with amazing displays of water magic. Project Wet and CH2MHILL helped to explain all about water quality.


Those who attended could participate in three types of water quality testing: well water, macroinvertebrate, and demo pond testing. Hands on activities on watersheds, groundwater, and the history of water helped to give the larger picture of where water comes from. Salt River Project came and spoke about the limited resources and ways to conserve the water Arizona has. Watermill Express with the spin of a wheel helped to teach about all kinds of water concepts and handed out fun prizes! And what event would be complete without live animals? Liberty Wildlife came and explained why riparian habitats are so important to the animals who call them home, with a live presentation and birds to get up close to and personal it was a lesson that was well received.

With 14 stations at which to stop and learn, visitors came and did not leave until the very end. Thanks to all our supporters who helped to make this day such a success, and we look forward to next year's event! Visit us and see what we are all about!

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Show Low

In celebration of World Water Monitoring Day and Children’s Environmental Health Month, on October 8, Show Low High School biology students tested the water quality of Show Low Lake and Fool Hollow Lake. See their report.

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California

On September 25, 61 Bell Elementary students from Ellen Ochoa Learning Center participated in the first World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) event hosted by the Los Angeles CH2M HILL office (LAC). In spite of the hot weather, students arrived at De Forest Park very enthusiastic and eager to start using their World Water Monitoring Day test kits.

Dave Jones, Water Business Group Lead of the Los Angeles office, was excited to welcome the children and increase their awareness in the protection of water quality. CH2M HILL employees from the Santa Ana office were also a part of this year’s WWMD effort. Maryam Alborzfar and Rob Henderson donned WWMD t-shirts and joined LAC employees in showing the kids how to test water for dissolved oxygen, acidity, turbidity and temperature.

During the overview of WWMD, the children demonstrated great interest and knowledge on water quality thanks to the great job their teachers Claudia Morales and Melanie McCord did in instructing them prior to the event. Going over the safety instructions was an interactive process in which the children again demonstrated great familiarity and excitement.

After the kids became acquainted with their CH2M HILL team leaders, they were taken to the bodies of water, which were fed by a storm drain. The process was very fun and educational especially because the site was full of trash, which allowed the children to better understand the harmful effects of pollution. Plastic bags, cans, water bottles and even a Barbie car were found in the water.

CH2M HILL/LAC was honored to have support from Zora Baharians of the City of Los Angeles Watershed Protection Division during this event. Baharians was very enthusiastic about teaching the children how to test for the different parameters and how to understand the results. Once all the children had an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in water monitoring, they boarded the bus to continue their World Water Monitoring Day adventure. It was then off to Dominguez Gap Wetlands, one of CH2M HILL’s projects.

Unlike the waterbodies at De Forest Park, the Dominguez Gap Wetlands were clean, beautiful and filled with wildlife. The children observed a mosaic of native plant communities and habitats—from tricolor blackbirds in the cattail thickets to great blue herons, ducks and other bird species. The Dominguez Gap Wetlands, located along the Los Angeles River north of the 405 Freeway, is a one-of-a-kind project in the Los Angeles County area. It maintains the integrity of flood protection along the urban lower reaches of the L.A. River, while introducing new water quality elements, groundwater recharge, restoration of native habitat, pedestrian/equestrian trails and environmental education.

After first monitoring a site filled with trash, the children now had an opportunity to see how engineered wetlands are an excellent way of treating contaminated water. At the wetlands, the group learned about the water cycle and how the wetlands’ large basins store water from the Los Angeles River and storm water, and recharge groundwater. David Towel, Senior Project Manager at LAC, shared his knowledge with the children on how wetlands function to enhance water quality.

The LAC World Water Monitoring Day event ended around noon with a tour of the wetlands. Throughout the tour the children demonstrated their interest in understanding the functions of wetlands plant life and posed questions about wetland engineering.

The WWMD event hosted by the LAC office was a great success thanks to all those who supported it. Despite the very hot weather, the children of Ellen Ochoa Learning Center really enjoyed the event and were very thankful for the opportunity to monitor the water. The world has now gained 61 new water monitors!

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Colorado

Denver

Denver area students helped kick-off World Water Monitoring Day 2008 on September 18 by monitoring water quality at the South Platte River. Volunteers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, CH2M HILL, and REI hosted over 100 middle and high school students from Earth Force, the Colorado I Have a Dream Foundation, cityWILD and ELK (Environmental Learning for Kids).

Participants learned firsthand about water quality by testing the South Platte River for four basic parameters of water quality (pH, turbidity, temperature and dissolved oxygen) and entering their results into the World Water Monitoring Day database. EPA displays, equipment and staff provided hands-on opportunities to learn about polluted runoff, microbiology and stream macroinvertebrates. Mayor John Hickenlooper proclaimed September 18 World Water Monitoring Day in the City of Denver as an opportunity to bring communities closer to their local waters.

Greeley

This year, the City of Greeley (Colorado) Water Pollution Control Facility (WPCF) and the Industrial Pretreatment Program (IPP) sponsored a World Water Monitoring Day event. The entire 5th grade—80 students—from Dos Rios Elementary School participated in the WWMD event, which was conducted at the Poudre Learning Center.

Mrs. Lynn Perrich, one of the many teachers who organized the children's participation stated, “This event is very important to the kids and allows them to interact with specialists, collect data and understand what affects our water resources.”

IPP technicians Eddie Treviño and Bob Alexander demonstrated to the groups how to collect the water samples and conduct the tests. Mrs. Yenni Garcia, a Graduate Fellow from the University of Northern Colorado, said she would like to collect the information several times throughout the year to create a database of the sampling sites. Two sites were sampled: a small lake (top picture) and a section of the Cache La Poudre River (bottom picture).

“We would like the kids to see what, if any, changes occur throughout the year and what impact that has on the aquatic life in these two bodies of water,” said Mrs. Garcia.

The children collected lots of data that now needs to be looked at to determine the health of the lake and the river. Isaac Sosa told IPP technician Eddie Treviño, “I really liked being a scientist for the day, collecting important information about the health of our river.” And Vanessa Gonzales said, “I really liked learning about our water resources and why we need to keep our rivers and lakes clean.”

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Florida

We are 61 fourth grade students from Miami Country Day School in sunny Miami, Florida, USA.  We learned how to use our water monitoring kits on the canal that borders our school.  Our high school students taught us how to use them. We found out that our canal was cleaner than we thought it would be:  the PH levels were 7 and 8, the dissolved oxygen level was 4ppm, the turbidity was clear, and our temperature was 26°C.

We decided to go test the water on the Miami River.  It has a reputation for being terrible, and for the last few years they have worked really hard to clean it up.  There are many boat repair businesses, shipping companies, fishing docks, and high rises along the 5 mile river.  Our first test site was at the Bayside, a big shopping mall where we boarded our boat.  Then we went to the mouth of the river where you could see tug boats hauling big freight boats.  We tested the water at five different locations on the river.  We tested near most of the draw bridges and in the areas we thought would be the most polluted.  We were really surprised to see that the river was rather clean.  The PH levels were 7 and 8, the water temperature ranged from 28-32°C, the dissolved oxygen levels were 4ppm, and our turbidity tests showed a high degree of clarity.

We thought the day was REALLY cool, and we were glad the the efforts to clean up the Miami River have worked!

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Georgia

On the afternoon of October 10th, 2008, two classes each of third and fourth graders from May Howard Elementary School, gathered to conduct the first World Water Monitoring Event in the Savannah, Georgia, area.  As a coastal community that relies on water for recreation, tourism, industry, as well as potable drinking water, water quality is a topic of high interest for all community members.  However, special emphasis was placed on this day, at educating the 70 students in attendance.

The students were able to collect water samples from the dock of Miss Judy’s Fishing Charters, located across the street from their campus on Wilmington Island.  Miss Judy is a local fishing legend, who for three decades has owned and operated her fishing charter business, and routinely supports the local elementary school and community around her.  The students were thrilled to meet Captain Judy, who is known for providing the daily fishing forecast for the local news and radio stations, and who not only generously offered the students access to beautiful Turner Creek, but even stuck around for the sampling activity!

The previous day had brought thunderstorms to the area, but that afternoon the weather stayed overcast and warm.  Remarks about the importance of good water quality were made by the school principal, Vernon Cole, as well as City of Savannah Councilman, Larry Stuber.  County Commissioner Pat Farrell, on behalf of Chatham County Commission, presented the school with a proclamation – that October 10th, 2008, was to be recognized as World Water Monitoring Day for the residents of Chatham County.  Also in attendance was Leo Beckman, representing the Georgia Ports Authority. 
 

The City of Savannah Environmental Affairs and Stormwater Department, along with the Metropolitan Planning Commission, printed posters for the students to take home, earmarking this special date in local history, as well as reminding them of a few important facts about water.  4th grade teachers Dawn McKinstry and Constance Hinely also ordered a copy of “A Waterproof Case” for each of the students, who even completed a homework assignment the night prior, to prepare for a successful event!

The students collected water samples from the dock in two groups, then split up into groups of 5 students to complete the four tests with assistance from their teachers, parents, and volunteers from the CH2M HILL Savannah office.  There was lively discussion about the results of the testing, and how the community enjoys the benefits of clean water every day, whether swimming, fishing, boating, or making a living, relying on the coastal waters.  A total of eight samples were tested, with results that indicate a healthy condition in our nearby waterways, but the students know it will be up to them, as the community’s future leaders, to keep these waters in condition to keep enjoying these rewards of coastal living. 

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Hawai'i

The first annual “Snapshot Day” was held at several sites around the state of Hawai’i on October 4, 2008. Hawai’i’s Snapshot Day is a volunteer water monitoring event with the goal to increase awareness about water quality issues and inspire individual action by residents and visitors to protect our water resources. The event was held as part of World Water Monitoring Day and International Year of the Reef, and provides a picture, or “snapshot” of water quality conditions at one point in time. Over 130 volunteers participated in this inaugural event on four islands; 38 volunteers attended the pre-training for the event a week prior.

After numerous discussions with coordinators representing various communities, we settled on nine sites on four islands: Hanalei-31 areas (Kauai); Pupukea Marine Life Conservation District-6 areas, Mamala Bay-Waikiki-1 area, Maunalua Bay-5 areas (Oahu); Ho’okipa-1 area, Kapalua Bay-1 area and Waihe’e stream-8 areas (Maui); and Puako-3 areas, Spencer Beach Park-1 area (Hawaii). Total number of areas sampled at 9 sites: 57.

Some sites provided a pre-training prior to the event on October 4, with a hands-on demonstration of the equipment.  Pre-trainings were held at: Pupukea MLCD, Maunalua Bay (for Maunalua Bay, Waikiki and Hanauma Bay volunteers), Puako (for Puako and Spencer Beach/Waiulaula watershed volunteers) and Miloli’i. Maui and Kauai elected not to hold pre-trainings. Thanks to Megan Webster, Makai Stewardship Coordinator, one of our partners from Maui, Land and Pineapple, Inc, we were able to standardize trainings as she provided us with a basic presentation on water quality that she utilizes for naturalist trainings on Maui.

Many sites provided their own equipment: Hanalei, Waikiki, Maunalua Bay, Spencer Beach Park, Waihe’e stream and Kapalua Bay. Parameters measured included: pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity/transparency, salinity/conductivity, nitrates, phosphates, water temperature. Two sites- Hanalei and Ho’okipa took enterococcus samples. This data is being recorded on the World Water Monitoring Day site and in an Access database.

Some sites included other activities during Snapshot Day. At Maunalua Bay, they had two other stations: 1) Biological Indicator: Coral Reefs and Water Quality Connections Learning Station. At this station, participants were able to observe sand samples under a microscope to determine terrigenous component. They also used look boxes to view water turbidity and had a demo of an YSI probe similar to that deploying in Maunalua Bay to monitor currents and turbidity. A sediment core sample from the shoreline taken and discussed with regards to its various layers. 2) Invasive Species and Water Quality Connections Learning Station. Participants were able to view samples of native and non-native (invasive) algae species, and observe how the invasive Avrainvillea amadelpha collects sediment. Connections between excess nutrients and the abundance of invasive species were also discussed. At Pupukea MLCD, also a Makai Watch site, volunteers surveyed for human use, took reef surveys, and provided reef education and outreach to visitors. At one of the Puako sites, human use data was collected.

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Illinois

Big Rock

Five employees of AECOM Environment’s Sustainability Committee teamed with local Cub Scout Pack 319 and the Community to participate in World Water Monitoring Day from October 10th through the 12th.  Three separate water bodies within the Chicago Metropolitan Area were monitored: Big Rock Creek, Blackwell Forest Preserve, and Lake Zurich.  AECOM lead 37 participants composed of family, friends, and Big Rock Cub Scout Pack 319.  
 

Participants collected a total of 38 samples; 23 from two separate stations within Big Rock Creek, 12 samples from Blackwell Forest Preserve and three samples from Lake Zurich.  The water bodies were chosen for their close proximity to participants home and work locations. 

The Cub Scout Pack was particularly engaged with hands-on learning about their local water quality and the value of protecting water resources.  AECOM Environment’s Sustainability Committee hopes to further promote the watershed check-up by inviting local schools and communities to participate annually.

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Chicago

The Gage Park High School River & Conservation Club is located at 5630 South Rockwell, in Chicago, IL 60629. Twenty-six of its members, grades 9-12, monitored the water quality of Tinley Creek, on October 9, 2008. This site is a tributary to the Cal Sag River. Tinley Creek is located in the Elizabeth Conkey Forest Preserves in Palos Heights, Cook County, IL. This site fostered special curiosity at the time because this area had been flooded two weeks prior to the monitoring day. It was a beautiful day, but rain was expected to come later, so there was a rush to complete the task.

The WWMD Kits as well as a variety of other kits were used to test the water quality. Nine chemical tests were completed within five days: DO, pH, temperature change, total phosphate, nitrate, turbidity, total solids, were completed at the site, and fecal coliform along with biochemical oxygen demand was complete later at school. A habitat survey, the benthic macroinvetebrate index, and discharge were determined at the site.

The club members divided up into 4 collaborative testing groups, plus 3 members were designated to go into the water, collect the water for the groups, and take out objects such as wood and rocks, so the groups could search for benthics. The creek was 40 centimeters higher than last spring. There was a large amount of erosion, probably because of the flood.  Moss had started growing on the many downed trees. Walking along Tinley Creek’s bank was an adventure, jumping over tree branches and trying to miss the large puddles of water. As the club members reflected on the data from the last six years of monitoring this site, the water quality hasn’t changed much, but the bank is eroding more each year. After this fall’s flood, the discharge was greater and the dissolved oxygen was higher.

Unique objects were found in the water or around the bank each year, and this year was no different. Picnic tables, beer bottles, soda pop cans, tools, magazines, and lawn mowers were pulled out of the water. The usual paint ball course had now been turned to a “bb” course. This was such a fun experience. There is never a dull moment with hands on learning!

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Indiana

Cub Scouts, students from local schools, and parents came together to monitor water quality in White Lick Creek in Brownsburg, Indiana on a beautiful Saturday morning in early October.  Local scientist, Greg Bright from Commonwealth Biomonitoring, helped the group collect fish from the stream to demonstrate how water quality affects fish communities.  The group collected 12 fish species, including some, like smallmouth bass and darters, that require excellent water quality.  Everyone then had a chance to touch the fish and return them to the stream.  The day was planned by the City of Brownsburg storm water program.

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Iowa

The staff and students at the Iowa School for the Deaf (ISD) have been involved in their local watershed improvement project for several years. In 2006, they began IOWATER monitoring in the Little Pony Creek and the rehabilitated wetlands on their Council Bluffs, Iowa campus. They participated in their first World Water Monitoring Day in 2007.


On September 25, the students from ISD, their instructor Kris Newton and a visiting student from neighboring Lewis Central Middle School met at Lake Manawa State Park to enjoy a WWMD field day. The group met with staff from United States Geological Survey (USGS), The Iowa Department of Ag & Land Stewardship (IDALS) and Pottawattamie County Resource Planner Kevin Seevers. Staff photographer Josh White from The Council Bluffs Nonpareil was also in attendance.

The students started at the Longs Landing Missouri River access site. The students were shown the boat, probes and sampling equipment that USGS uses to monitor the river. The students learned that USGS tests for the same parameters that they test for and how the data is used.

As part of their campus water monitoring project, USGS has partnered with ISD and the West Pottawattamie Soil & Water Conservation District to install a real time monitoring station on the school grounds. The monitor collects data from both the wetlands and the creek every 15 minutes and uploads the data to the USGS website. The students can monitor the gauge depth, precipitation, and the air and water temperature from their computers anytime. The data can be found on the USGS website.

The students then moved to Boy Scout Island, a public area on Lake Manawa. Lake Manawa is a large recreational lake that is on the Iowa Department of Natural Resources 303D list of impaired waters. There the students collected several water samples for testing. Using IOWATER testing techniques. tests were done for pH, dissolved oxygen, chloride, phosphates, nitrates, nitrites, and water and air temperature.

The kids’ favorite part of the day was wearing hip and chest waders as they waded into the lake to collect specimen macrinvertebrates for identification. The students also enjoyed seeing their story in the newspaper the next day ("More to Lakes than Water and Fish”) and have learned the importance of the conservation practices used to improve water quality.

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Kentucky

Grayson

On September 23, 2008, 12 employees from Smithfield Food's Grayson plant, led by Wastewater Manager Cliff Evans, participated in World Water Monitoring Day. Seven new employees, bringing the total number of new hires for the facility to over 300, participated in the effort during their orientation to the plant.

The employees sampled water quality from the Little Sandy River located behind the plant. Being an environmentally friendly plant is something that has been taken seriously over the years. Together we can keep our earth healthy and this world beautiful for generations to come.

Lyon County

More and more, students are leading the efforts to protect their local environment. Living in a world shrunken by technology, they have a better understanding of the interdependence of important natural resources in a larger, global setting. The Lyon County Conservation Youth Board participated in World Water Monitoring Day by testing the waters at Kuttawa Beach area on Monday, September 22. Each month the Youth Board members test the waters and send in the results to the Division of Water. In observance of World Water Monitoring Day, the youth also conducted a habitat assessment at the test site.

Each year, World Water Monitoring Day presents an important opportunity for young people to become involved in safeguarding natural resources on a local, national and international scale. While engaged in this annual event, students can learn more about the watersheds in which they live, how watersheds work and how protecting their waters can have beneficial impacts downstream.

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Louisiana

This year, Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality scientists Kyle Levy, Rhyshima Parms-Green and Al Hindrichs have taken on the responsibility of recruiting and assisting four local educational organizations with their involvement in this year’s event. They will be going to each organization’s selected testing site, delivering free-of-charge special water quality test kits to them and remaining on site to assist them with the use of the kits. 

The educational organizations participating are Baton Rouge Magnet High School Environmental Science Club, who have chosen to test Bluebonnet Swamp, Baker Middle School, (Cypress Bayou), Greater Mount Carmel Baptist Church Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts Troop (Comite River) and St. Thomas More Catholic School (School Pond). Each will perform water quality tests on their chosen waterbody for dissolved oxygen, temperature, turbidity and pH by using the special test kits provided.  After performing the tests, they will share their results with the entire world on the World Water Monitoring Day website at www.WorldWaterMonitoringDay.org. 

By participating in World Water Monitoring Day, the students and members of each organization will gain an increased knowledge of how they can help build public awareness and become an active participant in protecting water resources in their community.

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Massachusetts

Agawam

On three different dates in October, biology and environmental science students from Agawam High School traveled to the Connecticut and Westfield Rivers and to Robinson State Park. At Pynchon Point, students tested river water for pH, turbidity, temperature and dissolved oxygen.

On that same day, the classes marked town storm drains with markers stating, “NO DUMPING. LEADS TO RIVERS AND STREAMS.” Half of the storm drains in Agawam are now marked. In the spring, the project will be finished.

The Robinson Park trip included water testing and bioassessment of macroinvertebrates at two water sites, a pond and a brook. Results prompted classroom discussion about diversity, ecology, conservation and invasive species.

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Billerca

On October 16, two third grade classes from Ditson Elemetary School in Billerica, MA participated in World Water Monitoring Day 2008. The field trip was concurrent to the third-grade curriculum of studying surface water. Students tested acidity (pH), clarity, dissolved oxygen levels and temperature in Nuttings Lake.

Woodard & Curran Vice President Jay G. Sheehan, PE, who participated in the event, commented, “At Woodard & Curran, we believe we have a responsibility to introduce future generations to the environment and foster good habits for environmental and pollution prevention.”

  • Volunteers who made the project possible include:
  • Local environmental consulting firm Woodard & Curran;
  • Billerica Wastewater Treatment Plant Lab Technician Jeff Kalmes;
  • Superintendent Lorraine Sanders;
  • Numerous Billerica town employees;
  • Teachers Lisa Bejian and Kathy Leavit;
  • Parents and other school chaperones.

On average, the results came back with a pH of 5.5, a clarity of 40, a dissolved oxygen level of seven parts per million and water temperatures of 19 degrees—generally as expected for the waterbody, excepting the low pH level.

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Boston

On Friday, October 3, the 27 sixth graders from the Amigos School in Cambridge, Massachusetts were excited for their field trip to Deer Island.  Deer Island is a former island, now peninsula in Boston Harbor.  “I can’t wait till we get there!” exclaimed one student on the bus ride. 

As participants in World Water Monitoring Day, the students did various water quality tests.  The tests performed included ammonia, air temperature, water temperature dissolved oxygen, turbidity and pH.  The pH of the ocean was 7, which is neutral.  The level of dissolved oxygen was 4 parts per million, which is 42%saturation.  The temperature of the air was 64° F. and the ocean temperature was 63° F.  The ammonia was medium.  The turbidity was 0 JTU’s (Jackson Turbidity Units), which means it was pretty clear.

The students did some field work too.  The students needed to find as many producers, consumers, and decomposers as possible at the test site.  Among producers that the students found were rockweed, brown kelp, algae, sea lace, seaweed and plankton.  Five of the consumers encountered by the students were periwinkles, rock crabs, green crabs, barnacles and mussels. The students flung out their homemade plankton nets to look at the plankton when they got back to their school.  What a day!

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Cambridge, Black's Nook Pond

On Friday, September 12, 27 sixth graders from the Amigos School in Cambridge, Massachusetts were excited for a field trip to Black’s Nook Pond in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Together the four teams of students used a World Water Monitoring Day water test kit to test the pond’s fresh water quality. The tests performed included ammonia, air temperature, water temperature dissolved oxygen, turbidity and pH.  The pH of the pond was 8, which is slightly basic.  The level of dissolved oxygen was 1 parts per million, which is a low percentage of saturation.  The temperature of the air was 63°F, and the pond temperature was 62°F.  The ammonia test turned out to be 0.  The turbidity was 0 JTU’s (Jackson Turbidity Units), which means it was pretty clear.

The reason that everyone participated in World Water Monitoring Day is because everyone is concerned with the wellness of the water and by submitting all of their data, they are trying to help make a difference.  Every single person felt great about this field trip and about testing the water.  The thing is that not only did they test the water; they found different organisms like decomposers, producers, and consumers of all levels.  They discussed how the biotic would change if and when the abiotic factors change in the pond.  On the bus ride back to school, most people mentioned that it was an amazing experience to test and record the water’s data!

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Cambridge, Charles River

On the morning of Friday, October 10, 27 sixth graders from the Amigos School in Cambridge, Massachusetts went on a field trip to examine the water of the Charles River under the command of their science teacher, Laurie Ferhani.  Some decomposers, producers, and consumers they encountered were bracket fungus, mold, lichen, reeds, grass, lilies, and clovers. Birds like Canadian geese, cormorants, seagulls, ducks, and pigeons were there.  We found grasshoppers, spiders, bees in the plants.  In the water, we saw some type of algae, some fish, and a freshwater clam shell.

The group tested different aspects of the abiotic water in this ecosystem.  According to the World Water Monitoring Day water test kit, the pH was 7, which is right in the middle of being acidic and basic and this signifies that the water is as healthy as it gets, pH-wise.  The turbidity was around 20 JTU’s, and the DO (dissolved oxygen) was 4ppm.  The temperature of the water was around 21°C. It was mostly clear skies with small amount of wind.  The students tested a total of three sites, the Charles River, Boston Harbor, and a small pond next to Cambridge’s reservoir Fresh Pond. Dreadfully few, if any, of the students had ever tested water prior to this and were exceptionally impressed with the results.

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Cambridge, Danehy Park

On Saturday morning, September 20, Mary White set up the World Water Monitoring Day kit on the display table. She was participating in the annual Cambridge Danehy Park Family Day, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Park was formerly a landfill, and constructed wetlands were incorporated along the perimeter of the park. Many children play in this cat-tailed wetland or at least by accident plow into the cattails when sledding down the mountainous slopes and sliding across into the marsh in the winter. In North Cambridge, close to Route 2 and the Alewife Brook Parkway, this wetland was once part of the “Great Marsh” that covered many hundreds of acres of wetlands. Now this marsh is but a remnant, perhaps a clay pond used in the manufacture of bricks common to this neighborhood.

She carefully filled her bucket from the solid edge, not to stir up the underlying sediment under a weeping willow tree. The event had her situated up by a play field as part of the community service organizations. She was also representing her local Girl Scout Service Unit, providing a hands-on activity for children to try as their parents talked to leaders about joining Girl Scouting. She was showing what types of activities Girl Scouts can do.

She had a wide range of ages participate, mainly younger children ages 5-9, boys and girls representing a very wide ethnic variety. Most were excited to be doing a scientific experiment. She always pointed to the wetland below where she obtained the sample. Luckily Mary was under a tree and able to keep the water temperature fairly constant. The children trickled by slowly so she could usually keep them all engaged and was not bombarded by a big rush at any one time.

She said, "It felt good to be doing this kind of thing at a table where kids are usually walking by quickly simply looking for free give aways- such as a pencil, frisbee or face-painting where they don’t learn the message behind the service group providing the goody. I think I really introduced them to important aspects of water quality, what is good for aquatic life and not so good and connected them to this local wetland." 

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Chicopee

Sixty-two fifth grade students from Selser Memorial School in Chicopee, Massachusetts participated in World Monitoring Day at Chicopee State Park on October 8. Four teachers, three staff members, and representatives from the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority in Boston and the Chicopee Water Department also assisted students with collecting and testing water samples.


Fifteen samples of water were collected and tested for pH, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Water and air temperature were also monitored. Students hiked the area and noted topographic and surface water runoff features. The site is a neighbor to Westover Air Reserve Base, which is a neighbor to Selser School. The area is a beautiful home for wildlife, and provides outdoor recreation and swimming for the students and their families.

An added bonus of the day was the water rescue simulations being practiced by the Massachusetts State Police. Turbidity levels were a little high, yet students were quick to point out that the helicopter/bucket rescue attempts may have churned up water from the bottom of the pond. Many students who participated stated that this event was, “The best field trip ever!”

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Michigan

Hundreds of Michigan students will have first hand-hand experience raising fish this year but unlike the usual home pet fish scenario with guppies or goldfish, these students are raising Chinook salmon.  Michigan’s Salmon in the Classroom program, sponsored by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, allows educators the opportunity to raise salmon from eggs they acquire at a hatchery in the fall until their release in a Michigan streams each spring.

During the developmental period in-between, the educators use activities provided in a teacher resource kit to educate their students about Michigan’s freshwater resources and the aquatic life that flourishes there. Many contributions make the resource kit popular including the World Water Monitoring Day kits donated to the program by Glenn Oliver, founder of H2bid.com.  “The partnerships make this whole program possible,” said the DNR’s Kevin Frailey who manages the program.  “There is no better way to teach stewardship for our natural resources than to have students actually be responsible for their success.”

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Mississippi

“Thus did I by the water’s brink another world beneath me think…” Thomas Traherne  

On October 14 and 15, students from Sarah Lawrence’s 8th grade Science class again had the opportunity to experience “a little watery chink, which one dry ox or horse might drink.”  Mississippi Power employees Michael Henderson, Jocelyn Walker, Mary Kirkland, Jennifer Coleman, Jonah Collins, Ann Dower, and Tiffany Sanders teamed up with the science class to monitor the waters of Grant Bayou in Pascagoula, Mississippi. 

The students attend Trent Lott Middle School (TLMS), one of three middle schools in the Pascagoula School District.  The employees of Mississippi Power led small groups of students and helped them take part in World Water Monitoring Day 2008.  Overall, 20 samples were taken from Grant Bayou by 130 students. 

For the past several years MS Power employees have helped Mrs. Lawrence’s students monitor the water quality of Grant Bayou in Pascagoula, MS.  The site was chosen because of its close proximity to TLMS.  The temperature of Grant Bayou was found to be 24°C, the range for DO was 4-6 ppm, the pH was 7 and the turbidity was 40 JTU. 

The students were excited to get out of the classroom and experience real world science.  The ultimate goal of this collaboration was to increase awareness of the importance of water quality since a very small percentage of the world’s water is actually drinkable.  Students were also made aware of the abundance of life in this important ecosystem and how changes in the water quality could affect everything in that ecosystem. 

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New Hampshire

In honor of World Water Monitoring Day 2008, fifth- and sixth-grade students at Seacoast Charter School in Kingston, New Hampshire studied their portion of the Powwow River Watershed.  Brian F. Goetz of environmental consulting firm Weston & Sampson led the students through the two-week project.

During his first visit to the class, Goetz discussed watersheds and sub-watersheds with the students. His presentation gave a broad overview and then highlighted the Powwow River Watershed, which drains to the Merrimack River and, eventually, the Atlantic Ocean.  During the presentation, the class was instructed to “be a watershed.”  This exercise involved the students holding buckets of varying sizes to represent the ponds, lakes, and rivers that feed into the Kingston portion of the watershed. The class then simulated a one-inch rainfall event. Each bucket was filled with an inch of water, and the students then worked their way through the “watershed” by emptying buckets from the top all the way down to the ocean. This demonstration gave the students a personal example of the interconnections that water bodies have in a watershed.

The second week, Goetz and the students sampled waters from the major water bodies in Kingston, drawing attention from the local newspaper.  The results of the students’ monitoring have been posted to the WWMD database, and the class plans on sampling again next year.

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New Jersey

On a warm, cloudy autumn day, over 75 students and their teachers from the Stockton School, Hunterdon Christian Academy, North Warren High School, Leonia High School, and a few home schooled students, interacted with staff from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC), the NJ Water Supply Authority (NJWSA), the Delaware River Greenway Partnership, and the NJ Watershed Ambassador Program (AmeriCorps) to celebrate WWMD at the historic Prallsville Mills, located along the Delaware River in Stockton, NJ, on Thursday October 16, 2008.  Attendees were welcomed by Leslie McGeorge (NJDEP-Water Monitoring & Standards), Bob Reiser (USGS-NJ Water Science Center), Carol Collier (DRBC), Ron Sworen (Hunterdon County Freeholder), and Edie Sharp (Delaware River Mill Society). 

The Mills, which date back to the 1700s and are located at the confluence of the Wickecheoke Creek, the Delaware & Raritan Canal, and the Delaware River, provided an ideal location for the event which showcased various freshwater and ground water monitoring demonstrations and hands-on activities. 

Participants learned about local freshwater biology and chemistry, water quantity and stream flow, as well as ground water issues.  The event introduced students to thinking about how every-day actions affect the environment, and water quality in particular, and taught them how to be better stewards to the environment.  The Stockton School students were also able to highlight their own monitoring program on their home river, the Wickecheoke Creek. 

Students worked side-by side with the professionals by taking ground water samples, measuring stream flow in the Delaware & Raritan Canal, as well as identifying freshwater macro-invertebrates and fish from both the Delaware River and the near by creek. Participants used the WWMD kit to perform water chemistry tests on samples taken from the Wickecheoke Creek – the results of which were entered into the International WWMD Database.  For those that were unable to attend the event, the NJDEP’s Volunteer Monitoring Program provided free monitoring kits and educational packets to teachers, informal educators and volunteer groups within New Jersey. Over 40 kits were given out to groups around the state.  The Volunteer and the AmeriCorps programs work to promote World Water Monitoring Day year-round and, each year, their efforts are drawing more and more attention to this important event. 

Many positive comments were received from participants throughout the event as well as after.  This is the 7th year that NJ has hosted this event, which is coordinated by NJDEP. Previous celebrations have been held at other locations around the state including Liberty State Park (near New York City) and Historic Batsto Village (a former bog iron and glassmaking industrial center from 1766-1867 located in the Pinelands portion of central/southern New Jersey).

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New York

On September 18, the students of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs School (Beverly Hills, Mich.) spilled into the streets of upper Manhattan. Armed with their science kits, they set out on a mission to test the rivers in the Inwood area of Manhattan on World Water Monitoring Day. Grades one through eight actively took part at three different testing locations.

At approximately 9:30 in the morning, the first- and fifth-graders set out on their journey west to the Hudson River, located at Swindle Cove, to begin their testing for turbidity, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), air temperature and water temperature. Fifty-two students participated in this group.

Around the same time, approximately 50 second- and fourth-graders proceeded to the east end of Dyckman Street to test the water.

The largest group, 120 third-, sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders went to the northern section of Inwood Hill Park to the estuary. At this point, the Hudson River and East Harlem River meet. This group was larger because the schools’ eighth-graders are familiar with the process of water testing and were able to lead and monitor the younger students.

Before setting out, the students familiarized themselves with the information needed to perform the task ahead. Analyzing the data collected made the actual testing of the water meaningful and educational. The students were presented with new ideas and concepts and, in the end, successfully tested the three river sites. Our Lady Queen of Martyrs hopes to be involved in the future and welcomes any new methods of teaching science and helping our environment.

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Pennsylvania

Did you ever wonder how the local rivers fared after the steel mills shut down?  Have they recovered? Ms. Sheehan’s Life Skills class at Aliquippa High School is finding out.  They became “Creekers” last year.  Creekers are students who adopt a local river then test, monitor and report its water quality on a monthly basis. 

This began last year when Ms. Sheehan received an invitation from Allegheny College in Meadville to attend teacher workshop during the summer.  Ms. Sheehan learned to conduct basic water quality tests in the field and the lab.  In exchange for participating in the day long workshop, Ms. Sheehan received over $700 worth of free science equipment for her class.   
 

Once a month during the school year, the Life Skills students visit their local field site, Raccoon Creek.  Using the equipment they received, water samples are taken and then analyzed to quantify 8 key water quality parameters: temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, phosphorus, nitrogen, turbidity and alkalinity.  All data is entered at the Creek Connections website and is accessible for students and the public to conduct seasonal and geographic trend analysis and to do site comparisons.

Using their new water testing equipment and benefiting from their year of experience, this year Ms. Sheehan’s class was able to be a part of an intentional water monitoring program—World Water Monitoring Day.

Check out the data collected at our stream site (Site #157, Creek Connections) at www.worldwatermonitoringday.org. The data is important to the long-term monitoring of all the watersheds in western Pennsylvania and southwestern New York. Researchers are always looking for baseline water quality data on streams before certain events have taken place like recent development (new buildings or parking lots) or natural disasters.  The data collected from World Wide Monitoring Day can be used by anyone interested in learning about their watershed.

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Rhode Island

During the month of October 2008, the Narragansett Bay Commission (NBC) in Providence, Rhode Island hosted water quality monitoring field trips for more than 500 students and teachers, from nine different Rhode Island communities. The water quality monitoring field trips are a part of the NBC’s year-long environmental education program, the Woon Watershed Explorers.

As a Woon Watershed Explorer, students in grades 3-5 complete hands-on activities to learn more about the health of their local watersheds. Through the Woon Watershed Explorers Program and the help of amazing students, the NBC is able to collect extensive water quality data every year. This year, water quality data was collected from eight different testing sites in Rhode Island.

NBC will complete more water quality tests with the students in January and April to see if there are seasonal impacts on the water quality. Through the Woon Watershed Explorers Program and the help of the Green Water Quality Monitoring test kits, students learn about the water quality parameters of dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, pH, temperature, and fecal coliform bacteria. They also learn about ways that they can help make a positive impact on their watershed.

Almost all of the testing sites in Rhode Island had low dissolved oxygen levels, but tested well for pH, nitrate, and phosphate. One site on the Woonasquatucket River in Smithfield, Rhode Island tested well for every single test including fecal coliform bacteria. It was also at that site where the salamander in the picture was found.

The Narragansett Bay Commission would like to sincerely thank all of the students, teachers, and chaperons involved in its Woon Watershed Explorers Program field trips for their hard work and dedication this October. Their data has been posted on the World Water Monitoring Day website so that others can view their findings.

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South Dakota

On Friday, October 3 a group of 21 third- through seventh-grade students tested the waters of the Missouri River and the Bad River, which border Lilly Park.  The students are participants in the 21st Century Community Learning Center, a federally funded program that provides children with academic enrichment opportunities during non-school hours. The program is staffed by the South Dakota Discovery Center.

Twice a month on Fridays, this group meets at Lilly Park in Fort Pierre. The group voted to test the water for its program on the third in honor of World Water Monitoring Day. After jotting down some personal water quality predictions, they headed off to monitor. Their first stop was the boat dock on the Bad River, where some students saw a fish jump. The second stop was through the tall grass trail leading to the Missouri River. There many noted that while they had swam in the river, they had never tested the water quality before. After lots of learning and fun, the majority voted to test the water again next year (if not before)!

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Tennessee

September 25 and 26 were great World Water Monitoring Day(s) at Discovery Center in Murfreesboro. Homeschool children, public school classes and private school classes all joined in the investigative fun— called Walk on the Wild Side.

Sponsored in part by a grant from Project WET, Tennessee students and adults spent the day engaging in hands-on activities of many kinds, including water testing. Discovery Center at Murfree Spring is located on a 25-acre urban wetland with a spring feeding it. Wading in the creek and testing the water quality for pH and temperature were a part of the days’ activities. Other stations included live wetland wild animal observations and petting of Discovery Center’s tame pets. Art and science about water were the focus of the field day.

Stations were designed to expose children to many aspects and the importance of wetlands. Food webs, catch and release of pond critters and plants, microscopic examination of protozoans that were living in the water, lessons on karst topography and watershed activities were all stations that were placed throughout the wetland. Students and adults chose their stations of interest. A count of 800+ students and adults attended the two day celebration.

Volunteer presenters included local municipal stormwater directors, Tennessee Wildlife and Environmental Conservation personnel, Murfreesboro City Park Department personnel, college students and Discovery Center Board members. Several local grocery stores and restaurants contributed reusable shopping bags and food for all of the volunteers. The two day event was a community affair and very successful in encouraging the public in the business of water quality concerns and monitoring.

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Virginia

On September 24, 2008, six associates from the Tetra Tech EM Inc office in Reston, Virginia participated in World Water Monitoring Day.  The group of environmental scientists and engineers collected water samples from the dock at Lake Anne, which is close to their office.  A resident goose also tried to join in the fun.  The activities led to lively discussion about the monitored parameters and what they indicate.  The group was relieved when the sampling was complete, and no one had fallen off the rickety dock into the lake.  It was a nice fall afternoon for a volunteer/community service event, and a good reason to get out of the office for a break!    
           

In conjunction with this event, two Stafford County residents also collected samples at Lake Curtis in Stafford County, Virginia on September 20.  They had been looking forward to it as a way to give back to their community and help the environment.  During water sampling activities, lots of small fish were observed in the lake.

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Washington

An experiential learning event organized by local teachers offered a glimpse into how the future Brightwater Treatment Plant and Environmental Education Center will serve educators and students when the new facilities open in 2011.

More than 160 students from Thoreau Elementary School, the Environmental Adventure School and Skyview Junior High School visited the Brightwater “North 40” Mitigation Area on Monday, Oct. 20. Students engaged in an exciting series of adventures, including a forest ecological expedition, data collection for World Water Monitoring Day, soil chemistry testing, and revegetating part of the North 40 with native plants.

A brief welcome ceremony took place on at the Brightwater “North 40” Mitigation Area, 22509 State Route 9 S.E., Woodinville. Speakers included former Governor Gary Locke; King County Executive Ron Sims; Snohomish County Executive Aaron Reardon; and Mike Gregoire, husband of Governor Christine Gregoire. Other featured attendees included Aaron Feik, President of Friends of the Hidden River, State Representatives Al O’Brien and Larry Francois, Superintendent, of Northshore Schools.

The event was organized by Friends of the Hidden River, a non profit community environmental organization in cooperation with King County.

The Friends of the Hidden River is a dynamic educational organization dedicated to developing and enhancing citizen understanding and community action in environmental education issues in the Puget Sound and surrounding regions. The group works to balance community interests with environmental sustainability by creating educational opportunities and service learning projects related to environmental and ecological stewardship, energy independence, water quality, conservation, and technology. They have raised nearly one million dollars to help create a LEEDs platinum environmental center at Brightwater.

The county’s Wastewater Treatment Division protects public health and water quality by serving 17 cities, 17 local sewer districts and more than 1.4 million residents in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties. Formerly called Metro, the regional clean-water agency now operated by King County has been preventing water pollution for more than 40 years.

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West Virginia

In the last few decades, global concern has narrowed its scope and focused on sustaining a healthy environment for future generations. On September 20th, Girl Scouts of the Black Diamond Council joined Project Flow at Oglebay Institute’s Schrader Environmental Education Center in an effort to enhance environmental awareness. Girl Scouts from troops 3352, 8048, 4904, and 8010 celebrated World Water Monitoring Day by successfully monitoring the health of Waddles Run, located in Oglebay Park, Wheeling, West Virginia.
 

The Girl Scouts completed a series of chemical tests used to calculate the health of a stream. After the completion the chemical tests, the Girl Scouts monitored the biological health of the stream by catching and identifying Benthic Macroinvertebrates. The day was commenced by taking a closer look at the Benthic Macroinvertebrates underneath a projecting microscope. The Girl Scouts examined the intricate anatomy of the invertebrates and discussed specific adaptations for individual species.

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Wyoming

Seventy-eight students from Saratoga Elementary and Saratoga Middle High School participated in World Water Monitoring Day through the Saratoga-Encampment-Rawlins (SER) Conservation District. In the beautiful Snowy Range Mountains fourth through sixth grades tested water at Brush Creek Ranger Station in the Medicine Bow National Forest.

Earth Science and Chemistry classes from Saratoga Middle High School conducted tests on the North Platte River which runs through the town of Saratoga. “Students who live here are very aware of natural resources and the importance of maintaining the health of those resources, especially our water”, explains Jean Runner, Education Coordinator for SER Conservation District. One sophomore chemistry student observed, “Our water is really clean and healthy and I like being out here doing testing instead of in the classroom.” This is the sixth year SER CD has involved area students in WWMD.

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